With US presidential campaign over, now it's time for 2016

Nov 10 2012, 16:22 IST
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Hillary Clinton has frequently ruled out a presidential run, but many Democrats think the allure of becoming the first female president might entice her into the race. Hillary Clinton has frequently ruled out a presidential run, but many Democrats think the allure of becoming the first female president might entice her into the race.
SummaryFrom Hillary Clinton to Paul Ryan, both parties appear to have deep bench from which to draw candidates.

The dust has barely settled from the 2012 presidential campaign, and already there is talk about who might run for president in four years, when both Democrats and Republicans will be searching for a nominee.

From Secretary of State Hillary Clinton - a Democrat who ran a tough primary battle against eventual president Barack Obama in 2008 - to Wisconsin Congressman Paul Ryan, the Republican vice presidential nominee this year, both parties appear to have a deep bench from which to draw candidates to compete for the chance to succeed Obama in 2016.

Here is a look at some of those who could be in the running during the next presidential election cycle.

REPUBLICANS

Jeb Bush

Bush, 59, is a popular former governor of the politically divided state of Florida who opted not to run in 2012. He will again face pressure from party activists to seek the White House in 2016. Many in the party believe he could have given Obama a better contest than Mitt Romney did this year.

But Bush might be reluctant to chase the presidency, in part because of his surname. He is the brother of former president George W. Bush and the son of former president George H.W. Bush.

Jeb Bush would have to decide whether a third Bush could get elected - his brother left office amid historically low popularity ratings - or whether he would face voter fatigue with the Bush name.

Jeb Bush, whose wife was born in Mexico, would have an easier time reaching out to increasingly potent Hispanic voters than the failed 2012 nominee, Mitt Romney. He has warned Republicans they must reach out to engage minority voters.

Our demographics are changing and we have to change not necessarily our core beliefs, but ... the tone of our message and the message and the intensity of it, for sure, Bush told NBC's Meet The Press in August.

An education expert, Bush chairs an education organization called the Foundation for Florida's Future. He showed his loyalty to the party by actively campaigning for Romney in Florida.

Marco Rubio

Another Floridian, Senator Marco Rubio, got tongues wagging by scheduling a speaking engagement in the early voting state of Iowa on Nov. 17, just 11 days after the election. The 41-year-old Cuban-American is a fresh face in the Republican Party and has built a solid reputation among conservatives by emphasizing America's founding principles and embracing the Tea Party movement. He was a keynote speaker

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