Social media fuel dangerous and elusive weight-loss goal

Comments 0
22-year-old Sara has dealt with eating disorders since high school and said the thigh gap phenomenon added to her problems while in college. (AP) 22-year-old Sara has dealt with eating disorders since high school and said the thigh gap phenomenon added to her problems while in college. (AP)
SummaryGoal for girls is to become so slender that thighs don't touch even when their feet are together.

said Wright, who works with Division I athletes. "I cannot think of one athlete I deal with" who has a thigh gap.

Experts say it is impossible to know if the pursuit of a thigh gap has caused any deaths, nor is it known how many eating disorders are blamed on the phenomenon. But Mysko said experts believe that "exposure to online images of extreme beauty standards and the drive to compare does increase the risk of developing eating disorders."

Sara, a 22-year-old Castlewood client, said thigh-gap sites were a contributing factor in her struggle. She spoke on the condition that she be identified only by her first name to avoid the stigma associated with eating disorders.

Always a high achiever, Sara was captain of her high school swim team in Minnesota and a straight-A student. In college, she graduated near the top of her class, even while hiding her secret.

It was in high school that Sara developed anorexia. By college, she was purging and excessively exercising. She was a frequent visitor to thigh-gap sites.

"It helped to normalize what I was doing to myself," Sara said. "I never knew before that I wanted a thigh gap. It felt like it was some type of accomplishment that people would want to achieve."

The sites offered photos of slender-legged models, testimonials on how to achieve the gap and tips such as chewing food but spitting it out before swallowing.

Grotesquely, some of the sites showed pictures of Holocaust victims "for motivational purposes" or martyred those who died from eating disorders. It seemed to make her own struggle OK, Sara said.

"I would say, `Well, I'm not that bad.'"

Her therapist, Kim Callaway, said she often encourages clients to avoid social media and even delete their Facebook pages.

"It's not uncommon for people to be on Facebook talking about what they ate today, posting pictures of their meals or writing about how they're 10 pounds lighter than they were a month ago," Callaway said.

"The ability to be instantly connected to everybody and see what they look like and see them blog or talk about what they are eating and what they

Single Page Format
Ads by Google

More from Health

Reader´s Comments
| Post a Comment
Please Wait while comments are loading...