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Nov 29 2012, 04:19 IST
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SummaryChina is considering changes to its one-child policy, a former family planning official said, with government advisory bodies drafting proposals in the face of a rapidly ageing society in the world’s most populous nation.

China considers easing family planning rules

China is considering changes to its one-child policy, a former family planning official said, with government advisory bodies drafting proposals in the face of a rapidly ageing society in the world’s most populous nation. Proposed changes would allow for urban couples to have a second child, even if one of the parents is themselves not an only child, the China Daily cited Zhang Weiqing, the former head of the National Population and Family Planning Commission, as saying on Wednesday. Under current rules, urban couples are permitted a second child if both parents do not have siblings. Looser restrictions on rural couples means many have more than one child. Population scholars have cited mounting demographic challenges in their calls for reform of the strict policy, introduced in 1979 to limit births in China, which now has 1.34 billion people.

Research In Motion loses patent dispute with Nokia

Research In Motion has lost a contract dispute over the use of Nokia patents in a case which could halt sales of its BlackBerry phones if it does not reach a deal to pay royalties to the Finnish company. Nokia said on Wednesday a Swedish arbitrator had ruled that RIM was in breach of contract and is not entitled to manufacture or sell WLAN products without first agreeing royalties with Nokia. Wireless local access network (WLAN) technologies, usually marketed under the WiFi brand, are used across BlackBerry devices and by most other smartphones. Nokia, which is trying to boost its royalty income as its phone business slides, said it had filed cases in the United States, Britain and Canada to enforce the arbitrator’s ruling.

Spain’s bailout banks to cut assets by 60%

European Union regulators are to give the go-ahead for (euro) 37 billion ($47.96 billion) bailout for four of Spain’s struggling banks — provided each of them cut their loans and investments by 60%. The plan approved Wednesday by the EU Commission will see Bankia getting (euro) 18 billion, Catalunya Caixa in line for (euro) 9 billion, Novagalicia receiving (euro) 5.5 billion and (euro) 4.5 billion for Valencia Bank. The (euro) 37 billion bailout is part of a (euro) 100 billion loan approved by the other 16 EU countries that use the euro to shore up banks hit by the 2008 property market collapse. Commission Vice President Joaquin Almunia said the aim was to restore the banks’ viability. The commission

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