Promise of deep-learning programmes

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SummaryUsing an artificial intelligence technique inspired by theories about how the brain recognises patterns, technology companies are reporting startling gains in fields as diverse as computer vision, speech recognition and the identification of promising new molecules for designing drugs.

contest at the last minute and designed its software with no specific knowledge about how the molecules bind to their targets. The students were also working with a relatively small set of data; neural nets typically perform well only with very large ones.

“This is a really breathtaking result because it is the first time that deep learning won, and more significantly it won on a data set that it wouldn’t have been expected to win at,” said Anthony Goldbloom, chief executive and founder of Kaggle, a company that organises data science competitions, including the Merck contest. Advances in pattern recognition hold implications not just for drug development but for an array of applications, including marketing and law enforcement. With greater accuracy, for example, marketers can comb large databases of consumer behaviour to get more precise information on buying habits. And improvements in facial recognition are likely to make surveillance technology cheaper and more commonplace.

Artificial neural networks, an idea going back to the 1950s, seek to mimic the way the brain absorbs information and learns from it. In recent decades, Dr Hinton, 64 (a great-great-grandson of the 19th-century mathematician George Boole, whose work in logic is the foundation for modern digital computers), has pioneered powerful new techniques for helping the artificial networks recognise patterns. Modern artificial neural networks are composed of an array of software components, divided into inputs, hidden layers and outputs. The arrays can be “trained” by repeated exposures to recognise patterns like images or sounds.

These techniques, aided by the growing speed and power of modern computers, have led to rapid improvements in speech recognition, drug discovery and computer vision. Deep-learning systems have recently outperformed humans in certain limited recognition tests. Last year, for example, a programme created by scientists at the Swiss AI Lab at the University of Lugano won a pattern recognition contest by outperforming both competing software systems and a human expert in identifying images in a database of German traffic signs. The winning programme accurately identified 99.46% of the images in a set of 50,000; the top score in a group of 32 human participants was 99.22%, and the average for the humans was 98.84%.

Deep learning was given a particularly audacious display at a conference last month in Tianjin, China, when Richard F Rashid, Microsoft’s top scientist, gave a lecture in a cavernous auditorium while a computer programme recognised his words and

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