Markets: Eerie calm

Markets: Eerie calm

it is not clear when market sentiment can change; as in the past, it can be quite sudden.
At a turn and yet not

At a turn and yet not

RBI could be tempted to cut policy rate to support growth at its bi-monthly review.

Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370: Fliers' thoughts, from 'no fear' to 'it's scarier'

Apr 12 2014, 12:33 IST
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'I never worried like this before what happened with the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370' (AP) 'I never worried like this before what happened with the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370' (AP)
Summary'I never worried like this before what happened with the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370'

Ihe Indonesian mother of three had flown without her kids before, but this was the first time she gave her eldest a to-do list in case something happened on the flight she and her husband were taking.

“I never worried like this before what happened with the missing Malaysia Airlines plane,'' Yulveri, who like many Indonesians uses only a single name, said at Jakarta's Soekarno-Hatta International Airport.

At airports across Asia and around the world, Flight 370 and its 239 passengers and crew, now lost for more than a month, are topics of avid speculation and sometimes anxiety. Passengers typically remain confident about the safety of air travel, but some are distressed by the disappearance, which _ given the number of people involved _ is unprecedented in aviation industry.

“The mystery over the missing plane had created many confusing, even terrifying, theories every day,'' Yulveri said. ``And the black-box must be found whenever and however, or it will become a black hole in the aviation world.''

Before she and her husband, an air force officer, left for a week-long tour of Japan's Hokkaido island, she talked to her 15-year-old daughter and asked her to take care of her younger siblings.

“What are you talking about, Mom?'' Yulveri quoted her daughter as saying. ``You will come home. We all will be fine.''

Here's what air travelers across Asia said Wednesday, Thursday and Friday when they were asked, ``One month later, how does the Flight 370 mystery affect your attitude toward flying?''

Yue Caifei, 65, a retired engineer from Tianjin, China, waiting at Beijing Capital Airport to set off on a 15-day group tour of the U.S.:

“I'm not afraid at all. Flying is generally really safe and accidents are really, really rare. What's the point of being afraid? We're living a good life, our children are grown and it's time for us to enjoy life. I'm going off to Hawaii and San Francisco and when I get back let's go get a drink.''

Jin Bijian, 34, a website-television multimedia producer headed from Beijing to Hong Kong to accompany a friend on a shopping trip:

“I'm really scared. I've always been a nervous flier and this only makes things worse. We have to find out what happened to the plane. We need to know what the risks are. Otherwise, it feels like anything can go wrong and we just don't know.''

Greg Corbishley, 49, who was heading home to

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