Logitech caught in mousetrap

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The No.1 maker of computer mice is fighting to increase its share of computer accessories market in an increasingly mouse-less world.   (Reuters) The No.1 maker of computer mice is fighting to increase its share of computer accessories market in an increasingly mouse-less world. (Reuters)
SummaryThe No.1 maker of computer mice is fighting to increase its share of computer accessories market in an increasingly mouse-less world.

segment is much lower, he said.

Semir Saleh, 25, is a case in point. A video-designer from London who is in Zurich freelancing for Swiss internet companies, Saleh said he had very little use for accessories.

The iPad comes with everything I need, he said.

I use for instance Skype a lot. The new one even comes with a camera so there is no need to buy one. According to Reuters company data, Logitech sales over the coming years are likely to stagnate at around 2.3 billion Swiss francs ($2.49 billion).

TURNING THINGS AROUND?

Chief executive Darrell was brought in from home appliances giant Whirlpool to turn the troubled company around, and will succeed current chief executive and chairman Guerrino De Luca in January next year.

He said although Logitech may have been slow to embrace new developments in the industry, it was never too late to start.

No matter when we started, I think it's smart to be in it, he said in the interview with Reuters.

One recent hit is Logitech's combination of keyboard and cover for the iPad, which according to technology analysts contributes around five percent to the company's annual turnover.

The cover has been such a success that Apple allows Logitech to sell it via its Apple stores.

But technology analysts say that original equipment makers will be quick to exploit such niches themselves. Microsoft's new Surface tablet will come fully equipped with a keyboard, for example, ZKB analyst Mueller said.

The company is pinning high hopes on Microsoft's new Windows 8 operating system, which is geared towards mobile users, and which Logitech expects to reanimate the moribund PC business.

But technology analysts say this will not necessarily boost sales of pointing devices such as computer mice as the trend is going more and more towards gesture and speech communication.

New multi-touch systems currently under development at universities and research labs in the United States and elsewhere could soon allow users to operate computer by gestures transmitted via a camera and video projector.

Logitech is simply non-existent in this field, said Kepler Capital Markets technology analyst Cyrill Pluess, meaning the company once again is running the risk of missing out on new mega trends.

Asked about the new technology, Darrell said it was too early to tell how it would be applied in workspaces and homes.

I by no means think the mouse is dead. It's

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