Letters to the editor: Planning decentralisation

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Summary“Making manifestos meaningful” (FE, November 26) is to actually make them real and enforceable. Clear, definite programmes or plans or promises with a time-frame

Planning decentralisation

“Making manifestos meaningful” (FE, November 26) is to actually make them real and enforceable. Clear, definite programmes or plans or promises with a time-frame for implementation should be insisted. Manifestos are offers. When the party or parties get elected, it is acceptance. And it becomes a contract. If there is any breach, it should be possible to throw out the government. Productivity forms part of the policy matter. For example, the MGNREGA can be made more productive and sustainable. Under present conditions of fast development of technology, we should plan decentralisation that every house becomes a productive factory that can contribute to the big industries. That should solve the problems of under-employment and unemployment and even bring prosperity.

Jacob Sahayam, Thiruvananthapuram

Miles to go

This refers to the column “AAP ki adalat” (FE, November 25). There is still a lot that the young political outfit needs to learn. But we cannot ignore the fact that the Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) has surprised even established players with its grassroots mobilisation, which is essential for a party to succeed electorally. Also, to be fair, Arvind Kejriwal’s vision of ‘crowdsourcing’ decisions is nothing but the decentralisation of power. He doesn’t mean for foreign policy to be crowdsourced, only local governance and policy issues. There is nothing new about this, but the AAP is the only political party that is talking about this today.

Adityavikram More, Mumbai

The German way

Apropos of the recent article “Learning from the Germans”, we fully agree with the authors about the need for major improvement in the skills of the youth. Such programmes are best driven by the states. Narendra Modi, quite recently, mentioned that Gujarat’s state skill development annual budget was R800 crore, while the central budget is only R1,000 crore. If the Gujarat skill development model is indeed yielding positive results, can other states learn from Gujarat, irrespective of political interest? Of course, the world famous German model can be used to improve existing systems.

P Sampath Kumar, Bangalore

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