Jallianwala Bagh massacre: After almost 100 yrs, UK PM David Cameron says 'shameful' but not 'sorry'

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Jallianwala Bagh massacre: After almost 100 yrs, UK PM David Cameron says 'shameful' but not 'sorry'. (Reuters)			    Jallianwala Bagh massacre: After almost 100 yrs, UK PM David Cameron says 'shameful' but not 'sorry'. (Reuters)
SummaryThe Jallianwalla massacre is likely to keep festering in the wake of no official UK apology.

arrangements, which includes Israel-trained Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) team.

Snipers also positioned themselves on the rooftops of the buildings situated in the vicinity of the Golden Temple, Jallianwala Bagh and at other spots from where Cameron's cavalcade was to pass.

Forces in plainclothes have also been deployed at numerous points in the city as part of beefed up security arrangements, police sources said.

Yesterday, security agencies had carried out a mock drill in view of Cameron's visit.

Meanwhile, President of Jallianwala Bagh Shaheed Parivar Samiti, Bhushan Behal, has demanded that the British Prime Minister should tender an apology for the 1919 massacre, "which will not only assuage the feelings of patriots and relatives of the victims, but will also confirm condemnation of brutal acts on innocent people by a British general".

Accompanied by Badal, Makkar and his official delegation, Cameron took a full round of the marbled periphery of the Temple before entering the Sanctum Sanctorum.

Before paying obeisance, he visited the community kitchen of the Golden Temple where he spent almost five minutes keenly watching the cooking process. He then interacted with three devotees and shook hands with them.

In the Sanctum Sanctorum, he was honoured with a saffron scarf offered by the Sikh Head Priest.

During his two-minute stay inside the Sanctum Sanctorum, he stood with folded hands. He also stood for a few seconds before the Akal Takht (highest Sikh temporal seat) situated in the marbled periphery.

Information officer of the Golden Temple Jaswinder Singh briefed him about the importance of Akal Takht, the brief history of the pious Sikh shrine and history of the founder of Sikhism Guru Nanak Dev.

Jassi also told him about the importance of recitation of Guru Granth Sahib.

Jassi said the British Prime Minister showed keen interest in Sikh history and culture, particularly tenets of Sikhism.

Before leaving the Golden Temple, he was presented with a replica of the Golden Temple, a set of Sikh religious books, a pictorial book comprising a Sikh encyclopedia and woollen shawls.

While leaving, Cameron simply wrote 'Thanks' in the visitor book of the Golden Temple.

Cameron is the highest democratically elected leader from Britain to visit the Sikh shrine.

Commenting on his visit, Makkar said it would send a positive message to the Sikh community around the globe.

After visiting the Sikh shrine, he visited the Jallianwala Bagh and factory of a basmati rice brand which exports to Britain and other countries.

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