Interview: Shailender Kumar, Vice President, Fusion Middleware, Oracle, India

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SummaryGovernment will be a heavy adopter of cloud

Government in India has been one of the earliest adopters of cloud computing for various e-governance projects. Many public sector organisations have undertaken pilot projects, or even operate some aspects of their operations in the cloud, says Shailender Kumar, vice-president, Fusion Middleware, Oracle India. Oracle Fusion Middleware is a leading business platform for the enterprise and the cloud. It enables enterprises to create and run agile applications while maximising IT efficiency through full utilisation of modern hardware and software

architectures. In this role, Shailender is responsible for growing Oracle revenues in the middleware market across India. He tells Sudhir Chowdhary that the biggest advantage that the cloud allows users is to use a world-class infrastructure without committing a huge amount of money or resources. Excerpts:

How far has the industry progressed in removing the barriers to cloud adoption?

We are seeing a steady growth in cloud adoption among organisations, led by businesses in telecom, BFSI, retail, education and healthcare sectors. The government too is emerging as a big adopter of cloud. Clearly, the IT

industry has succeeded to a large extent in addressing some of the big barriers to cloud—particularly the concerns around security and privacy of data. The evolution of private cloud model has encouraged many organisations to adopt private or hybrid clouds. Vendors such as Oracle today promise an open architecture and well-defined service level agreements to address some of the other concerns around quality of service, vendor lock-in and the ability to integrate on-cloud applications with on-premise ones.

Is the government sector in India using cloud in a big way?

Government in India has been one of the earliest adopters of cloud computing for various e-governance projects. A major fillip was the announcement of a cloud infrastructure at the NIC data centre as well as a centre of excellence on cloud computing by IT minister Kapil Sibal last year. Many public sector organisations have undertaken pilot projects, or even operate some aspects of their operations in the cloud. Other state governments including Orissa, West Bengal and Madhya Pradesh have

embraced cloud. For the governments, a private cloud means access to all benefits of cloud computing but with none of the attendant data security concerns. On their part, IT vendors including Oracle have enabled cloud adoption by offering the next generation of cloud-based government services delivery. The goal is to help governments develop flexible systems that integrate multiple functions and departments.

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