Indian poachers threaten lesser-known animals

Aug 18 2014, 13:34 IST
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SummaryWildlife poachers, hindered by India's efforts to protect majestic endangered animals including tigers and rhinos..

Wildlife poachers, hindered by India's efforts to protect majestic endangered animals including tigers and rhinos, have begun to think smaller. And activists say scores of the country's lesser-known species are vanishing from the wild as a result.

The Indian pangolin - a scaly critter whose defense mechanism of rolling up into a ball is no help against humans - and the star tortoise - a popular pet that maxes out at a foot in length - are just two of the species that are being killed or smuggled in increasing numbers while conservation efforts focus on such iconic animals such as tigers and elephants.

''The problem is that we were turning a blind eye to all lesser-known species and suddenly this very lucrative trade has been allowed to explode,'' said Belinda Wright, director of the Wildlife Protection Society of India, an advocacy group.

Wildlife specialists say the growing affluence of China, Vietnam and other Southeast Asian countries has helped drive the demand for exotic animals. Some are kept as pets, while others are eaten for their purported but questionable medicinal or aphrodisiacal properties.

Pangolins are killed for their meat, which is considered a delicacy, and their scales, which are used in traditional Chinese medicine. The scales are made of keratin, the same protein that forms hair and fingernails, and have no documented medicinal value.

The pangolin trade was once obscure in India, with an average of only about three a year reportedly killed by poachers between 1990 and 2008. Wright said that soared to an average of more than 320 per year from 2009 to 2013.

That only covers confirmed seizures. Customs officials and wildlife experts estimate that seizures form only 10 percent of the total illegal trade. The International Union for the Conservation of Nature estimated in a report last month that more than a million pangolins have been poached from habitats in Asia and Africa.

Star tortoise seizures by airport and port customs officials also have increased dramatically, from an average of less than 800 per year from 1990 to 1999 to more than 3,000 per year from 2002 to 2013, according to the protection society.

Similarly, the growing demand for lizard skin, meat and bones has led to the near-disappearance of the monitor lizard in the Indian countryside, said Tito Joseph, a program manager for the society. Monitor lizard meat, especially the tongue and liver, is mistakenly believed

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