Hydrogen cars could be headed to showroom near you

Nov 21 2013, 14:27 IST
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Cars that run on hydrogen and exhaust only water vapor are emerging to challenge electric vehicles. (AP) Cars that run on hydrogen and exhaust only water vapor are emerging to challenge electric vehicles. (AP)
SummaryCars that run on hydrogen and exhaust only water vapor are emerging to challenge electric vehicles.

gas molecules. The electrons move toward a positive pole, and the movement creates electricity. That powers a car's electric motor, which turns the wheels.

Since the hydrogen isn't burned, there's no pollution. Instead, oxygen also is pumped into the system, and when it meets the hydrogen ions and electrons, that creates water and heat. The only byproduct is water. A fuel cell produces only about one volt of electricity, so many are stacked to generate enough juice.

Hydrogen costs as little as $3 for an amount needed to power a car the same distance as a gallon of gasoline, Mutolo said.

Manufacturers likely will lose money on hydrogen cars at first, but costs will decrease as precious metals are reduced in the fuel cells, Mutolo said.

Toyota said its new fuel cell vehicle will go on sale in Japan in 2015 and within a year later in Europe and US

Toyota's fuel cell car is a ''concept'' model called FCV that looks similar to the Prius gas-electric hybrid.

Honda, which has leased about two-dozen fuel cell cars since 2005, took the wraps off a futuristic-looking FCEV concept vehicle in Los Angeles. It shows the style of a 300-mile range fuel cell car that will be marketed in the USand Japan in 2015.

Stephen Ellis, manager of fuel cell marketing for Honda, also wouldn't say where vehicle will be marketed in the USBut he expects hydrogen fueling stations to be abundant first in California, and then Northeast states. He predicts it will take five years for the stations to reach significant numbers outside California, and up to 25 years to go nationwide.

Hyundai wouldn't say how many fuel-cell Tucsons it expects to lease. The company believes that fuel cells will power the next generation of cars, appealing to affluent, environmentally conscious customers because affordable battery technology has not advanced enough.

''This is the sort of technology that makes batteries look old-fashioned,'' says North American CEO John Krafcik.

But skeptics say hydrogen fueling stations are more expensive than electric car charging stations, partly because electricity is almost everywhere and new and safe ways for producing, storing and transferring hydrogen will be needed.

Carlos Ghosn, chief executive of Nissan Motor Co., which has bet heavily on electric vehicles for its future, is one vocal skeptic.

''Having a prototype is easy. The challenge is mass-marketing,'' he told reporters. He said he did not see a mass-market fuel cell

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