HSBC cuts India growth forecasts for fiscal years 2013, 2014

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HSBC has cut its GDP forecast for the year ending in March to 5.2% from 5.7%. (Reuters) HSBC has cut its GDP forecast for the year ending in March to 5.2% from 5.7%. (Reuters)
SummaryHSBC has cut its GDP forecast for the year ending in March to 5.2% from 5.7%.

HSBC further cut its India growth forecast for the current and next fiscal years, saying the slowdown in the economy has become more structural than cyclical.

HSBC cut its GDP forecast for the year ending in March to 5.2 percent from 5.7 percent, and its forecast for the next fiscal year to 6.2 percent from 6.9 percent, according to a report released on Thursday.

"We think the reform process will take time and it will likely be another three years before growth returns to 8 percent on a sustained basis," it said.

HSBC had previously cut its India growth forecasts for fiscal 2013 and 2014 in September.

HSBC lowers India's FY13 growth forecast to 5.2 pc

New Delhi, Jan 10 (PTI): HSBC has cut India's growth forecast for this fiscal to 5.2 per cent from 5.7 per cent, citing insufficient progress on structural reforms and slow

implementation of infrastructure investment projects.

HSBC has lowered India's growth forecast for this fiscal to 5.2 per cent from 5.7 per cent projected earlier, and for financial year 2013-14 to 6.2 per cent from 6.9 per cent.

HSBC said the fiscal and current account deficits have turned "uglier", but the recent reform push, if sustained, should help lift growth and "beautify" the twin deficits, but

it will take some time.

"We think the reform process will take time and it will likely be another three years before growth returns to 8 per cent on a sustained basis," Qu Hongbin MD and Co-head Asian Economics Research at HSBC said in a research note.

Growth is expected to recover from 5.2 per cent the current fiscal to 6.2 per cent in 2013-14 and further to 7.5 per cent in 2014-15.

Meanwhile, rating agency Fitch warned this week of a downgrade in India's sovereign rating in the next 12-24 months citing slowing GDP growth and weak public finances.

In April and June last year, another rating agency S&P, had warned of further downgrades, which would put India into a junk status from the current lowest investment grade rating of BBB-.

HSBC, however, lauded the government's reforms push and said: "All in all, policy in India is moving in the right direction and the reforms will likely continue to inch forward, although much still needs to done and some of the bills may not passed in the near term".

"However, it is important to be realistic about how

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