Gunday review: Offers pumped up beefcake, plumped-lip eye candy

Feb 15 2014, 13:40 IST
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‘Gunday’ is as generic as its name suggests: even that old phrase ‘luchchhe- lafangey’ had more character. ‘Gunday’ is as generic as its name suggests: even that old phrase ‘luchchhe- lafangey’ had more character.
SummaryFilm review Gunday: I don't think there's one significant quiet spot in this film, says Indian Express critic Shubhra Gupta.

blowing, just like they did in the '70s and the '80s.

The design is meticulous and everything looks as if it belongs to the period, but we are left waiting for something, anything new. Why do a '70s style film with actors whose body language belongs to the here and now? Both Singh, who is a little more effective than his jodi-daar, and Kapoor, tread the same path that Bachchan and co. did 40 years back, and get very little out of it for themselves. Chopra is given precisely one scene in which she takes the pants off the boys, and one little improbable twist, but leaves barely any impact.

The ones who do, exit too soon. Both Manu Rishi and Pankaj Tripathi, both of whom appear in the portion where the boys are young, are given just a few minutes. That leaves the space clear for Irrfan to chew the scenery, which he does with customary relish. He’s the only one who is aware that he is sending up a '70s-style Bollywood cop, and shows us he is having a blast, even if it is from the past.

The rest is strictly, and depressingly, by-the-numbers.

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