China oil imports likely to rise more in second half: Clyde Russell

Feb 01 2013, 12:32 IST
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Some of China's top refineries plan to raise crude runs by about 4 percent in 2013. (Reuters) Some of China's top refineries plan to raise crude runs by about 4 percent in 2013. (Reuters)
SummarySome of China's top refineries plan to raise crude runs by about 4 percent in 2013.

The easy thing to predict about China's crude oil imports this year is that they will be higher than in 2012, the trickier question is by exactly how much.

Once again it appears that the major factors determining the extent of the gain will be how much new refining capacity comes online and how much new strategic storage is commissioned.

These two factors are uncertain, making an estimation of likely gains in crude demand a bit of a guess, but there is enough information to help make some early forecasts.

Some of China's top refineries plan to raise crude runs by about 4 percent in 2013, according to a Reuters poll of 18 major plants, which have a combined capacity of 4.83 million barrels per day (bpd) or 44 percent of total capacity.

If this 4 percent increase in runs is applied to the total refining capacity, it implies an increase in crude processed to 9.73 million bpd from 2012's 9.36 million.

This means a jump of about 375,000 bpd in crude processed, and it's likely that this will mainly be met by increased imports as domestic oil output is likely to be little changed at around 4.1 million bpd.

However, it's worth noting that refinery runs reached a record 10.493 million bpd in December, well above what the poll suggests they may average for the whole of 2013, suggesting there is upside risks to crude demand if operating rates continue at near last month's levels.

In what may just be little more than coincidence, the Reuters poll figure of a 4 percent rise in refinery runs is exactly the same as the International Energy Agency's latest forecast for China's oil-product demand growth in 2013.

The agency expects China's demand to rise to 9.984 million bpd in 2013, up from 9.595 million last year.

The IEA figures, being product demand, doesn't correlate exactly to crude demand, but suggests that crude and net product imports will have to total almost 6 million bpd this year.

Crude imports averaged 5.42 million bpd in 2012, a gain of 6.8 percent over 2011, while net product imports were around 300,000 bpd.

Together, crude and net product imports were around 5.72 million bpd in 2012, meaning to reach 6 million bpd, an additional 280,000 bpd would have to be imported.

Given the refiners polled say they will process about 375,000 bpd more, this implies that net product imports will decline in 2013.

This is likely to take the

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