Cabinet to clear India’s tough stand at Doha climate meet

Nov 22 2012, 01:02 IST
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SummaryThe Union Cabinet will approve on Thursday a tough negotiation approach for India at the Climate talks in the 18th Conference of Parties in Doha starting next week.

The Union Cabinet will approve on Thursday a tough negotiation approach for India at the Climate talks in the 18th Conference of Parties in Doha starting next week.

As the second commitment period of the Kyoto Protocol is scheduled to be operationalised by January 1, 2013, by the developed countries, India wants to insist on unconditional adoption of the emission limitation commitments by the developed country parties as listed in the “Annex B” of the Kyoto Protocol by December 31, 2012.

India will also resist the demand to terminate the Ad Hoc Working Group on Long-term Cooperative Action (AWG-LCA) at Doha, as there are several unresolved issues related to equity, unilateral trade actions, and technology-related intellectual property rights, which the Environment Ministry feels will “fall off the table” and hurt the interests of India and other developing countries.

The Indian negotiators also want to counter at working group stage unilateral decisions by parties, like the European Union’s imposition of tax on flights coming into EU or Canada’s renouncement of the Kyoto Protocol. India does not want to give further concession to the developed countries for securing the implementation of the second commitment period because such a commitment was already agreed in the last round of Climate talks in Durban in 2011.

The Environment Ministry is also of the view that India can, if need be, indicate its readiness to ratify on final or provisional basis such amendments if the parties so decide.

In the event that Kyoto Parties disagree to ratify the legal amendments before December 31, 2012, India will insist that it is the Kyoto Parties’ responsibility to fulfill their legal commitments.

As for the period for the second commitment period is concerned, India would like to insist on an eight-year period (2013-2020) to avoid mid-term review before 2020.

However, if there is no unanimity among G-77 and China on this, it may agree to a five-year period provided there is an understanding that the second commitment period is operationalised through provisional application or other appropriate means to facilitate ratification of legal amendments before 2015.

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