Bollywood fails box office collections for kids

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Children’s films, as a genre, remains largely untapped in Indian cinema. What is it that’s stopping it from flourishing at the marquee? Children’s films, as a genre, remains largely untapped in Indian cinema. What is it that’s stopping it from flourishing at the marquee?
SummaryChildren’s films, as a genre, remains largely untapped in Indian cinema. What is it that’s stopping it from flourishing at the marquee?

We don't have too many children's films so the genre hasn't been given space to develop which is probably why the genre has not done too well with its box office collections.

The notion adults carry of a children’s film is rather kiddish, with everyone laughing and falling. That’s a sad myth. A film like Taare Zameen Par can also be entertaining and change a child’s way of thinking.

“Nothing you do for children is ever wasted,” said an American author and musician Garrison Keillor. The marketing world is likely to nod in agreement at that, as kids form the biggest target group, be it in selling a product or marketing a film.

Ironically, the film world seems to be at a loss when it comes to catering to the core group of children. Eighty six out of 200 films that were screened at the recently concluded 18th International Children’s Film Festival were from India. However, the downside of it is that 90 per cent of those 86 films have not seen the light of day in theatres. This is generally the state of affairs when it comes to the genre of children’s films.

In fact, films made for kids have reduced considerably over the years, and the fate of the ones that were made recently, further fuelled the belief that children’s cinema is not commercially viable. For instance, a film like Chillar Party, produced by Disney UTV and Salman Khan, won critical acclaim and even a National Award, but the collections of the film were a meagre Rs.5.45 crore. Taare Zameen Par was the only exception in this case, wherein it garnered Rs.62.48 crore and was declared a hit. The general perception that children’s films are not commercially viable continues to prevail.

Even the existence of an autonomous body called the Children’s Film Society of India (CFSI), which is committed to strengthening children’s film movement within India and across the globe, has not been able to reduce the prejudice surrounding children’s films as commercial properties.

The CFSI, however, is counting its blessings. “This year has been a good year for us because we’ve made good films like Shilpa Ranade’s Goopi Gawaiiya Bagha Bajaiiya and Buddhadeb Dasgupta’s Woh. CFSI has made more than 260 films in the last 40-45 years. But while the production requirements are looked after by the government, the distribution remains a headache. I’m trying to understand

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