Barack Obama faces mounting pressure over Syria at G20 summit

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US President Barack Obama listens to comments during a working session at a G-20 summit in St. Petersburg. World leaders are discussing Syria's civil war at the summit but look no closer to agreeing on international military intervention to stop it. (AP photo) US President Barack Obama listens to comments during a working session at a G-20 summit in St. Petersburg. World leaders are discussing Syria's civil war at the summit but look no closer to agreeing on international military intervention to stop it. (AP photo)
SummaryPutin greeted Obama with a thin smile and a businesslike handshake.

US President Barack Obama faced growing pressure from Russia's Vladimir Putin and other world leaders on Thursday to decide against launching military strikes in Syria, which many of them fear would hurt the global economy and push up oil prices.

Express opinion: No-win in Syria

At a summit of the Group of 20 (G20) developed and developing economies in St. Petersburg, Putin greeted Obama with a thin smile and a businesslike handshake, a clear sign of the strains between them over how to respond to a chemical weapons attack in Syria.

Russia blocks UK call for strike on Syria

Obama also wore a stiff smile before talks began over dinner on the world economy and then on Syria, and there was none of the arm clutching or hugs between the two presidents that is typical of such occasions.

Syria refugees top two million, UN sees worst crisis since Vietnam

The rift over Syria overshadowed the discussions on how to revive growth but not before splits emerged within the group over a U.S. plan to wind down an economic stimulus program. The G20 accounts for two thirds of the world's population and 90 percent of its output.

Dangers of military intervention

The first round at the summit went to Putin, as China, the European Union, the BRICS emerging economies and a letter from Pope Francis all warned of the dangers of military intervention in Syria without the approval of the U.N. Security Council. Kerry says sample reveals sarin gas used in Syria, Russia unconvinced

"Military action would have a negative impact on the global economy, especially on the oil price - it will cause a hike in the oil price," Chinese Vice Finance Minister Zhu Guangyao said.

United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon later told the leaders over the dinner in a tsarist-era seafront palace that any military action must have the Security Council's backing.

"Let us remember: every day that we lose is a day when scores of innocent civilians die," his office quoted him as saying. "There is no military solution."

Poison gas attack

Obama blames forces loyal to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad for the August 21 poison gas attack in the Damascus suburbs that killed up to 1,400 people. Moscow says Obama has not proven that claim and says rebel forces may have

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