Avoiding Malaysia Airlines MH17-type tragedy: Here's how to keep 8.3 mn flyers safe

Jul 30 2014, 11:16 IST
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Despite the Malaysia Airlines MH17 crash, industry experts acknowledge the difficulties. (AP) Despite the Malaysia Airlines MH17 crash, industry experts acknowledge the difficulties. (AP)
SummaryMalaysia Airlines MH17 tragedy put all flyers, 3.1 bn passengers last year, on notice.

More travelers are flying than ever before, creating a daunting challenge for airlines especially in the wake of the Malaysia Airlines MH17 tragedy. And that raises a very crucial question: keep passengers safe in an ever more crowded airspace.

Each day, 8.3 million people around the globe, roughly the population of New York City, step aboard an airplane. They almost always land safely.

"In some areas of the world, there's going to be a learning curve," says Patrick Smith, a commercial airline pilot for 24 years and author of "Cockpit Confidential." But that doesn't necessarily mean that the skies are going to become more dangerous. "We've already doubled the volume of airplanes and passengers and what's happened is we've gotten safer."

To meet the influx of passengers, airlines will need to hire and train enough qualified pilots and mechanics.

Governments will have to develop and enforce safety regulations. New runways with proper navigation aids will have to be constructed.

Industry experts acknowledge the difficulties, but note that aviation has gone through major growth spurts before and still managed to improve safety along the way.

Last year, 3.1 billion passengers flew, twice the total in 1999. Yet, the chances of dying in a plane crash were much lower.

Since 2000, there were fewer than three fatalities per 10 million passengers, according to an Associated Press analysis of crash data provided by aviation consultancy Ascend.

In the 1990s, there were nearly eight; during the 1980s there were 11; and the 1970s had 26 deaths per 10 million passengers.

The last two weeks have been bad for aviation with the shooting down of a Malaysia Airlines flight followed by separate crashes in Taiwan and Mali. But the rare trio of tragedies represents just a fraction of the 93,500 daily airline flights worldwide.

"Aviation safety is continuing to get better. A sudden spate of accidents doesn't mean that the industry has suddenly become less safe," says Paul Hayes, director of air safety for Ascend.

As global incomes rise, people in Southeast Asia, Africa, Latin America, India and China want to travel more. Airplane manufacturer Airbus says that while U.S. traffic is growing 2.4 percent a year, emerging countries are seeing 13.2 per cent annual growth.

These carriers many unheard of outside their region are adding new jets at a breakneck pace. In the next six years alone, Indonesia's Lion Air will get 265 new planes and India's IndiGo will receive 125, according to Bank of America.

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