1. Solar Eclipse 2017: Mystery behind today’s total blackout, all you need to know

Solar Eclipse 2017: Mystery behind today’s total blackout, all you need to know

Solar Eclipse 2017: Albert Einstein while talking about his general theory of relativity in 1915 stated that one way to prove his proposition was to show that light from a distant star bends during an eclipse. Well, he was right.

By: | New Delhi | Published: August 21, 2017 11:18 AM
solar eclipse, solar eclipse 2017, what is a solar eclipse, Solar Eclipse 2017 in India, solar eclipse August 21, how eclipse helps science, solar eclipses in the future, eclipse in america, total solar eclipse, science news The Eclipse of August 21, that is set to happen in a few hours today, is unusual as it will cut diagonally across the entire United States. (Photo: AP)

Solar Eclipse 2017: Albert Einstein while talking about his general theory of relativity in 1915 stated that one way to prove his proposition was to show that light from a distant star bends during an eclipse. Well, he was right. English astronomer, Arthur Eddington during the eclipse of 1919 observed the right amount of bending. The total solar eclipse occurs every year 2 to 3 times. The Eclipse of August 21, that is set to happen in a few hours today, is unusual as it will cut diagonally across the entire United States. Today, scientists will understand the corona and its relationship to space weather. Corona or the sun’s outer crown is what grabs the attention of the astronomers during the total blackout- the corona of the sun is so bright that even satellites can’t gaze straight at the sun.

While artificial eclipses are used by scientists to study the phenomenon, nothing can match a real one like that of today. Artificial eclipses help but can’t match a real one. There is a downside too to this as it will disrupt common life. Because of the Solar Eclipse, solar power will not be available for about three hours. According to Indian Express, the grid operators across the United States are hoping that the eclipse will help them learn more about how solar power behaves during disruptions, which will allow them to prepare for cloudy days or storms.

Did you know! Back in the time, during the 150 BC, Greek astronomer Hipparchus was able to learn that the moon perfectly aligned with the sun in Turkey while about 80% of the sun was blocked in Egypt, about 1,000 km away during an eclipse. He calculated the distance between Earth and the moon using trigonometry.

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