1. Scientists are tracking a whale shark which has travelled 3000 kms from Gujarat

Scientists are tracking a whale shark which has travelled 3000 kms from Gujarat

Researchers are tracking the whereabouts of a 18-foot long female whale shark through a satellite transmitter fitted to it. The whale shark has been tracked for more than 100 days and researchers say the mammal has travelled a distance of about 3000 kms.

By: | Published: August 10, 2017 6:46 PM
whale shark, Gujarat, Wildlife Trust of India, Scientists experiment, endangered species, satellite transmitter  According to the researchers of Wildlife Trust of India (WTI), before the satellite was tagged on the seventh whale shark, this was tried on six others which did not bear fruitful results since the signal stopped transmitting for at least 40 to 60 days. (Representative image Reuters)

Researchers are tracking the whereabouts of a 18-foot long female whale shark through a satellite transmitter fitted to it. The whale shark has been tracked for more than 100 days and researchers say the mammal has travelled a distance of about 3000 kms. According to researchers, the distance travelled by the shark is one of the longest migratory movement of whale sharks ever recorded in the Indian sub continent. According to Hindustan Times, after it set out from the coast of Gujarat on December 30, the shark is heading towards the Somalian coast. According to the researchers of Wildlife Trust of India (WTI), before the satellite was tagged on the seventh whale shark, this was tried on six others which did not bear fruitful results since the signal stopped transmitting for at least 40 to 60 days.

Professor BC Choudhury who is the principal investigator and advisor for this project has said that the satellite tagging helps them find the whereabouts of this whale shark as to where it is going, whether it returns back to Gujarat for mating. Whale sharks are known to gather off the Somalian waters and the satellite transmitter attached will help them understand whether this one breeds in those waters. Knowing more about this endangered species will help them design a more potential conservation and management plan in collaboration with other countries.

 

  1. L
    Laura Morris
    Aug 11, 2017 at 7:47 pm
    Whale sharks are fish, not mammals. The Shark Research Ins ute has been monitoring the migrations of whale sharks using satellite telemetry since 1993, and has wide experience with various attachment systems. Considering the high cost of satellite tags both in terms of monetary expense and effort, please ask WTI to contact SRI
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