1. Get ready for biggest & brightest ‘Supermoon’ in 70 years; NASA’s tips to click spectacular photographs

Get ready for biggest & brightest ‘Supermoon’ in 70 years; NASA’s tips to click spectacular photographs

The full moon on November 14 will be the biggest and brightest one in nearly 70 years, which makes it a perfect time to go out at night and enjoy the spectacular sight, and if you are a photography enthusiast, this cannot get any better. This November moon is called the supermoon because the full […]

By: | Published: November 14, 2016 12:09 PM
supermoon, moon, supermoon nasa, nasa, supermoon when, supermoon where, where to watch supermoon This November moon is called the Supermoon because the full phase will take place at the moon’s closest point in the orbit around the Earth which is also known as the perigee. According to NASA, the supermoon will appear slightly larger (around 15 percent bigger) than a typical full moon. This moon will not be so big till the year 2034. (Source: Reuters)

The full moon on November 14 will be the biggest and brightest one in nearly 70 years, which makes it a perfect time to go out at night and enjoy the spectacular sight, and if you are a photography enthusiast, this cannot get any better. This November moon is called the supermoon because the full phase will take place at the moon’s closest point in the orbit around the Earth which is also known as the perigee. According to NASA, the supermoon will appear slightly larger (around 15 percent bigger) than a typical full moon. This moon will not be so big till the year 2034.

Supermoon is a natural phenomenon, which is not too rare as it occurs every 14 full moons. According to reports, by the end of this year, there will be one more supermoon in December. What differentiates the November moon is the fact that, it will come the closest to earth after January 1948. On November 14, 2016, the moon will be 356,508 kms from the earth. We will be able to see such a phenomenon only in the year 2034, when it will be even closer to Earth, at 356,445 km.

In India, people will be able to see the full size of the moon from around 4:53 pm. The Supermoon is called as perigee-syzygy moon by astronomers. However big this moon might be, a naked eye cannot differentiate the difference between one supermoon with the next, so it is better to go out there and marvel at the beauty of it. NASA has even given you tips to click the best photographs. Enter Bill Ingalls, NASA’s senior photographer has a few things to say. Here is a breakdown:
1) Don’t just click the moon

“Don’t make the mistake of photographing the moon by itself with no reference to anything, I’ve certainly done it myself, but everyone will get that shot. Instead, think of how to make the image creative—that means tying it into some land-based object. It can be a local landmark or anything to give your photo a sense of place.”
2) Use technology and do your homework

“I use Google Maps and other apps – even a compass — to plan where to get just the right angle at the right time. A slight miscalculation can result in a mad scramble; he recalls seeing hundreds of photographers who set tripods hundreds of yards away for a supermoon shot from Washington’s Iwo Jima monument. I thought my calculations were wrong, but – sure enough – the moon popped up right where I expected and then came the stampede, he chuckled.”

3) Even basic things are enough

“I had just basic equipment and saw all these people with great telescopes making a picture I could never get. So what could I do differently? Ingalls aimed his long lens between the trees, using the red light of his headlamp to paint the forest with a long exposure. The result was magical, with National Geographic naming his comet image one of the top 10 space photos of the year.”

4) Just a smartphone? Good to go

“It’s all relative. For me, it would be maddening and frustrating—yet it may be a good challenge, actually. You’re not going to get a giant moon in your shot, but you can do something more panoramic, including some foreground that’s interesting. Think about being in an urban area where it’s a little bit brighter.”

5) DSLR tip

“Ingalls uses the daylight white balance setting for capturing moonlight since sunlight is being reflected. For those with longer lenses, he advises, ‘Keep in mind that the moon is a moving object. It’s a balancing act between trying to get the right exposure and realising that the shutter speed typically needs to be a lot faster.”

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