1. Long commuting hours hit productivity: Survey

Long commuting hours hit productivity: Survey

Long commuting hours to work everyday affect productivity, believed 60 per cent respondents of a survey conducted by JobBuzz, an employer-rating platform powered by TimesJobs.com.

By: | Published: July 14, 2015 4:42 PM
office work

The survey finds that 57 per cent employees in metros and 43 per cent employees in small cities spend more than an hour in commuting to office every day. (Reuters)

Long commuting hours to work everyday affect productivity, believed 60 per cent respondents of a survey conducted by JobBuzz, an employer-rating platform powered by TimesJobs.com. The survey finds that 57 per cent employees in metros and 43 per cent employees in small cities spend more than an hour in commuting to office every day. The survey was conducted among 536 working professionals across India.

Industry experts link the biggest impact of long commutes to stress-related health issues, and its adverse impact on employee productivity and job satisfaction.

To find out more on this, JobBuzz conducted a ‘Work Commuting Survey’ of India Inc. employees. The survey showed that a whopping 60 per cent of the respondents felt spending more time to reach work directly affected their day-to-day performance and hampered their productivity.

“What employees feel instinctively has been substantiated by numerous health studies that show the adverse effects of long commutes ranging from increased cholesterol and blood pressure, to anxiety and even depression,” Vivek Madhukar, COO, TimesJobs.com said.

The survey results show that over 50 per cent of India Inc employees spend more than an hour commuting to work every day while another 30 per cent spend at least half an hour getting to office.

The survey also established a link between the proximity of the company to one’s home and taking up a job as an essential criterion. It said that 52 per cent of the respondents wanted an office near home. However, 48 per cent felt the proximity of one’s office to one’s home did not matter if the job and salary were fitting.

In terms of gender, 65 per cent male respondents felt proximity to home was a crucial factor in deciding their acceptance of an offer of employment. However, only 37 per cent female employees felt the same way. A whopping 63 per cent of female employees clearly stated that proximity was not a concern for them if career and financial benefits were good.

On being asked what kind of company they would choose to work for, 40 per cent of the survey respondents said they would choose an organization that was located less than 30 minutes away from their homes.

Over 24 per cent respondents said they would choose a company within a 5 km radius near home, while 21 per cent said they would go for a company that offered higher conveyance allowance or fuel reimbursements. Nearly 15 per cent of the respondents said they would work for a company that provided conveyance facility.

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