1. Microsoft to power its data centre with wind energy

Microsoft to power its data centre with wind energy

Microsoft said its Cheyenne datacentre in Wyoming will now be powered entirely by 237 megawatts of wind energy.

By: | New York | Published: November 15, 2016 1:19 PM
"Our commitment extends beyond greening our own operations because these projects help create a greener, more reliable grid in the communities in which we operate," Brad Smith, President and Chief Legal Officer, said in a Microsoft blog post on Monday. (Reuters) “Our commitment extends beyond greening our own operations because these projects help create a greener, more reliable grid in the communities in which we operate,” Brad Smith, President and Chief Legal Officer, said in a Microsoft blog post on Monday. (Reuters)

Microsoft said its Cheyenne datacentre in Wyoming will now be powered entirely by 237 megawatts of wind energy.

“Our commitment extends beyond greening our own operations because these projects help create a greener, more reliable grid in the communities in which we operate,” Brad Smith, President and Chief Legal Officer, said in a Microsoft blog post on Monday.

“That’s why we are announcing our largest wind energy purchases yet – 237 megawatts of wind energy – that will allow our datacenter in Cheyenne, Wyoming to be powered entirely by wind power,” Smith added.

Microsoft has also structured the purchase and partnered with the local utility in novel ways to facilitate a shift of cities and states towards a cleaner energy grid.

Microsoft said it entered into agreements with two wind farms to power its Cheyenne datacentre from renewable sources.

Of the two partnerships, Microsoft has procured 178 megawatts from the Bloom Wind Project in Kansas through Allianz Risk Transfer (ART) to help bring this new project online and partnered with Black Hills Corp. to purchase wind power from the 59-megawatt Happy Jack and Silver Sage wind farms in Wyoming.

With these energy deals, Microsoft’s total investment in wind energy projects in the US has gone up to over 500 megawatts.

“The combined output of the Bloom and Happy Jack/Silver Sage projects will produce enough energy on an annual basis to cover the energy used at the datacenter,” Smith said.

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