1. Saince Health Tech’s RapidRx app writes error-free prescription on your mobile

Saince Health Tech’s RapidRx app writes error-free prescription on your mobile

Saince Health Tech’s RapidRx app helps doctors access a database of 26,800 licensed drugs

By: | Published: October 26, 2016 6:07 AM
“The unique feature of this application is accessibility to a comprehensive database of over 26,800 licensed drugs sold in India that include generics, brands, strengths, in-take method and dosage. “The unique feature of this application is accessibility to a comprehensive database of over 26,800 licensed drugs sold in India that include generics, brands, strengths, in-take method and dosage.

An illegible prescription is one of the most common reasons for medical errors. Here is an app that makes prescription reading easy, thus leaving little room for error in drug dispensing. Health-tech startup Saince Health Tech’s mobile-based electronic prescription application, RapidRx, enables physicians to prescribe medicines electronically to patients, who will receive a text message to procure drugs from pharmacists.

“The unique feature of this application is accessibility to a comprehensive database of over 26,800 licensed drugs sold in India that include generics, brands, strengths, in-take method and dosage. It is a very intuitive app that enables doctors to write prescriptions in a few seconds,” said Raghuvir Vedantham, founder, Saince.

Hyderabad-based Saince HealthTech, a subsidiary of US-based Saince Inc., focuses on the intersection of the world of medicine with information technology and has operations in India and the US. Vedantham, who has a passion for the healthcare space, believes that technology can have a significant impact in not only improving patient care but also lowering the cost of medical care. “We are currently in talks with the Medical Council of India, ministry of health and Indian Medical Association to get the app vetted,” he said.

Inaccuracy in writing and poor legibility, use of abbreviations, incomplete writing of a prescription, omitting the
total volume of solvent and duration of a drug infusion, can lead to misinterpretation by healthcare personnel. In fact, the US Department of Health and Human Services and other federal agencies formed the Quality Interagency Coordination Task Force in 2000 and issued an action plan for reducing medical errors.

Today, increasing drug over-prescription or over usage incidences are a result of non-availability of patients’ past records at the point of care. In a country like India neither the patient nor the doctor maintains a record of medicines
prescribed. This app keeps track of all prescriptions of each patient including the history, leading to better utilisation of drugs and minimising side effects.

“This app will also help us understand drug recalls, batch numbers or any medical errors which lead to over 250,000 deaths,” he added.

Saince believes that healthcare apps are going to be most effective when used in union with physicians and will go a long way in improving patients’ health habits. “Our goal is to push its adoption with doctors and patients,”’ he said. He hopes to get 25,000 doctors to adopt the app by end of this year.

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