1. OLX shows how to fund dream purchases; does it pass muster? Find out here

OLX shows how to fund dream purchases; does it pass muster? Find out here

The four ad film creatives, one each in Hindi, Marathi, Kannada and Telugu, take forward the Bech de proposition for OLX. The common thread in all the ads is a situation where a young lad (cast as a ‘son’ in three of the four films) wants a bike but doesn’t have the moolah to foot the purchase.

By: | Published: June 14, 2016 6:20 AM

The Campaign

The four ad film creatives, one each in Hindi, Marathi, Kannada and Telugu, take forward the Bech de proposition for OLX. The common thread in all the ads is a situation where a young lad (cast as a ‘son’ in three of the four films) wants a bike but doesn’t have the moolah to foot the purchase. The father, with a limited budget, advises him to arrange for the rest of the money himself. What follows are comical sequences where the boy sells unwanted items lying around in the house, thereby scrunching up the money to get his dream bike.

Our Take

In 2015, OLX.in had changed its messaging from Khareed Le to Bech De highlighting how one can actually earn disposable income on the basis of selling items they don’t need. Talking to the younger audience, the company has launched a new campaign extending its Bech De proposition. Through the films, the online marketplace for used goods wants its audience, comprising college students and young professionals, to not feel
dejected in life because of financial constraints.

The Hindi film is a rap face-off between a father and son set over a dining table over financing the latter’s wish for a new bike. In the Telugu film, the brand uses the appeal of film actor Allu Arjun who tells his younger brother to sell his old bike on OLX and get a stylish sports bike so that they can fashionably go back home after he is done ‘beating up the goons’. The Marathi film is a story of a young boy whose father uses his skills as a theatre actor to shortchange the demands of his son. The son finally comes of age by using OLX to get what he wants.

The Kannada film is again a humourous take with the son manipulating his father for permission to sell items no longer being used in the house. Eventuazlly, the parents have the last laugh as they zip away for a ride on their son’s new sports bike.

Of the four films, the three regional ones are more relatable. The Hindi film which shows everyone in the family doing a ‘mundi dance’ catches one’s attention but the message is lost somewhere. The Telugu film takes a cue from over-the-top film sequences as it features the actor; the Marathi film is an emotional one; and the Kannada TVC is a humourous take on the two generations trying to outwit each other.

Thankfully, the company opted for different regional advertisements rather than dubbing the rather weak Hindi TVC for regional markets. Says Arun Iyer, chief creative officer, Lowe Lintas, “Our creative strategy was to talk to our target audience in a language they would understand best. Instead of running the same creative nationally, the team came up with four unique stories for each of the key markets.”

Compared to the previous campaign, this one is sans the catchy song. The films end with OLX. Sell it reminding people to fulfil their dreams through OLX. The campaign’s message is simple and so is the execution. There is nothing new to offer to the viewers. However, the TG it is targeting does want new things and wants them now; here, the utilisation of the marketplace is shown in a relevant light.

Tags: OLX
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