1. McDonald’s to hire 2,50,000 employees, turns to Snapchat to snap-up young talent

McDonald’s to hire 2,50,000 employees, turns to Snapchat to snap-up young talent

McDonald's is now accepting applications, called snaplications, on social networking site Snapchat.

By: | New Delhi | Updated: June 15, 2017 5:53 PM
McDonalds, Snapchat, Snaplication McDonald’s uses Snapchat for accepting applications for jobs. (Reuters)

Do you like to want to work at McDonald’s, well if you do then, then you can send a snaplication to the fast food behemoth? Yes, you heard it right, the fast food giant is now accepting applications, called snaplications, on social networking site Snapchat. Snaplications is a first-to-market tool used by McDonald’s. Jez Langhorn, senior director of human resources at McDonald’s USA, told Fortune magazine, ”We thought Snaplications is a great way for us to meet prospective employees. We can meet them where they are, on their phone”.

Snapchat users can apply at McDonald’s in the US after they swipe a 10-second McDonald’s advertisement video and all an interested candidate has to do is swipe the app and be directed to the career webpage of McDonald’s, according to CNBC.

McDonald’s is planning to hire 2,50,000 employees across the United States this summer and over half the new employees are expected to be aged between 16 and 24. McDonald’s takes pride in the fact that for most Americans their first job is at their fast food outlets and the move to recruit employees through Snapchat can be seen as a ploy to target youngsters who are tech-savvy, according to Fortune.

McDonald’s had earlier used the Snapchat platform in Australia earlier this year. The fast food giant is now looking to spread to other applications such as Spotify and Hulu to look for employment seekers.

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According to the data released by the Bureau of Labor and Statistics (BLS) of the United States, the teen labour force in the country has been on a decline since 1979. BLS expects this trend to continue, as reported by CNBC.

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