1. Coca-Cola’s #BrotherlyLove campaign missing the local Indian flavour

Coca-Cola’s #BrotherlyLove campaign missing the local Indian flavour

Though running global campaigns across markets isn’t new, advertisers agree that localising is important to create a connect.

By: | Published: January 17, 2017 6:50 AM
Though running global campaigns across markets isn’t new, advertisers agree that localising is important to create a connect. Though running global campaigns across markets isn’t new, advertisers agree that localising is important to create a connect.

For a major multinational company to run its global campaign across markets is not a new phenomenon. Every now and then, a single campaign is aired across regions to emphasise on the brand’s message and vision. Or often, their ‘locally’ adapted versions.

Most global campaigns tend to focus on universal truths: emotions that resonate with people all across the globe — love, sex and peace. And then each of these can have their own avatars. For instance, for 2016 Rio Olympics, P&G ran its tear-jerker Thank you, Mom ad from the Wieden & Kennedy stable, continuing a six-year run with a two-minute film depicting the strong mothers behind Olympic athletes.

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Now consider Coca-Cola India which has launched #BrotherlyLove, a commercial capturing the camaraderie between two brothers.

The film, released on YouTube late last month, is the brand’s Indian execution of the international ad which was launched in January 2016. The film highlights the unique and challenging relationship experienced between two brothers. When the younger brother finds himself without his ice-cold Coca-Cola and is bullied by other kids, his big brother comes to the rescue.

Following the ‘one brand’ strategy of introducing one single iconic brand campaign that celebrates both the product and the brand, Coca-Cola launched the Indian version of the Brotherly Love TVC which depicts everyday moments of life.

“We have a bouquet of ads as part of our global Taste the Feeling campaign from which we choose the ads which are best suited to the Indian context and reality,” says a Coca-Cola spokesperson. “Brotherly Love’s Indian version differs from the global campaign in terms of the nature of playful bullying between brothers around Coca-Cola along with new situations added to bring in freshness to the

ad campaign.”

“Love can be segmented into a spouse’s love, a lover’s love, a wife’s love, sisterly love, brotherly love and more. Coke has used one of these segmented positions to popularise itself,” says Harish Bijoor, brand expert and founder of Harish Bijoor Consults. This is not the first time the company has done so.

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