1. Around The World; From Mark Zuckerberg to Shazam, here is what made the news

Around The World; From Mark Zuckerberg to Shazam, here is what made the news

A Harvard dropout but a successful entrepreneur, Facebook CEO and co-founder Mark Zuckerberg was invited to address Harvard’s 366th Commencement recently.

Updated: June 6, 2017 3:19 PM
Apart from making a statement about how he met his wife Priscilla at the university and launched a prank website called Facemash, Zuckerberg cleared the air about how he is sure that millenials already have a sense of purpose.

Create a renewed sense of purpose, says Mark Zuckerberg: A Harvard dropout but a successful entrepreneur, Facebook CEO and co-founder Mark Zuckerberg was invited to address Harvard’s 366th Commencement recently. Apart from making a statement about how he met his wife Priscilla at the university and launched a prank website called Facemash, Zuckerberg cleared the air about how he is sure that millenials already have a sense of purpose. “I am here to tell you finding your purpose isn’t enough. The challenge for our generation is creating a world where everyone has a sense of purpose…But it’s not enough to have purpose yourself. You have to create a sense of purpose for others,” he said as he mentioned that technology and automation are eliminating many jobs. He went on to say that purpose creates true happiness.

In his address, the 33-year-old also shed light on his hardest time while leading Facebook, when everyone wanted the company to be sold; and since Zuckerberg did not agree, “within a year or so every single person on the management team was gone”. Facebook’s CEO highlighted three ways of creating the world where everyone has a sense of purpose: “taking on meaningful projects together, redefining equality so everyone has the freedom to pursue purpose and by building communities across the world.”

Zuckerberg also touched upon the monetary issues that entrepreneurs and start-ups face, and thus refrain from finding their true sense of purpose. He noted how giving everyone the freedom to pursue purpose does not come for free. “People like me should pay for it. Many of you will do well and you should too,” he said adding that this is the reason why he, along with his wife, began the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative and committed their wealth to promoting an equal opportunity.

Pushing the listeners to start working in this direction, he further said that ideas don’t come out fully formed, rather they only become clear as one works on them; one just has to get started. “The reality is, anything we do will have issues in the future. But that can’t keep us from starting,” he claimed. Zuckerberg also received an honorary degree from the University.

When Shazam faced memory loss

It is not easy to decode technological glitches, especially when a downloaded app on the handset goes for a toss. Shazam, the UK-based service that can identify music, movies, advertising and television shows, based on a short sample played using the microphone on the device, faced a temporary memory loss when its users logged in. The idea was to draw attention to the disease called Alzheimer’s. To educate the younger audience about it, non-profit Alzheimer’s Research UK partnered with Shazam and gave the app the debilitating symptoms of the disease, giving users a hard-hitting insight into the daily struggles people suffering from Alzheimer’s have to face.

The digital campaign, The Day Shazam Forgot, was created by Innocean, UK. The campaign saw the app having difficulty remembering the names of songs; it couldn’t seem to place the song’s singer or recognise the lyrics it was tasked to identify. The results of the 120-second campaign were astounding: it registered over two lakh impressions, and 6,096 visitors logged into the Alzheimer’s Research UK donation page. The one-day campaign was directed towards millennials and to remind them that Alzheimer’s doesn’t just affect seniors, it can hit people as young as 40.

Drawing attention to the fact that over 40,000 people under 65 are living with dementia in the UK, the message mirrored the existing user interface of the app to make sure that users truly believed that the app had forgotten. A series of different creative lines were also developed so that users were delivered different messaging. Once Shazam eventually found the listenter’s song, a call-to-action message was delivered saying, “Alzheimer’s destroys precious memories. Help us in the fight to save them. Donate now.” The app’s users were then directed to the donation page of the charity, where they were asked to contribute towards further research.

Ikea’s Frakta bags get fashionably sustainable

THE TRADEMARK BLUE Frakta bags from Ikea are getting a new lease of life. The move comes when $0.99 blue oversized carry bags from the Scandinavian retailer were imitated by Balenciaga, a French luxury fashion house. In Dubai, the retailer teamed up with the creative agency Memac Ogilvy & Mather to print a set of lines on the interior of each bag. The lines guided the consumers about how to turn the bag into various things including a baby bib, apron, picnic mat, raincoat for pets, etc.

It definitely turned Ikea’s one of the best selling items even more versatile. Most of the bags were sold out within a week, claimed the company. To Balenciaga, Ikea responded with an ad on its website telling a fake Frakta bag from the real. The cheeky ad read: “1. Shake it. If it rustles, it’s the real deal. 2. Multifunctional. It can carry hockey gear, bricks, and even water. 3. Throw it in the dirt. A true Frakta is simply rinsed off with a garden hose when dirty. 4. Price tag. Only $0.99.” The luxury bag was priced at $2,145.

Though innovative, this is not the first time that Ogilvy & Mather has tried giving a second life to a product. In fact, its China office had previously tried giving ‘second lives’ to empty Coca-Cola bottles in 2014. Second Lives transformed the bottles into various objects such as water guns, whistles, paint brushes, bubble makers, etc. The idea was to get Coca-Cola’s customers in Vietnam to recycle. The campaign cleverly asked, “What if empty Coke bottles were never thrown away?”

Amazon ‘books’ its offline play

Amazon, credited with eliminating many bookstores into oblivion with its efficient pricing and delivery, seems to have come full circle with Amazon Books. It seems that Amazon is bent on making hay while the sun shines. After its grocery store Amazon Go, the brick-and-mortar stores of Amazon Books aim to integrate the benefits of offline and online shopping. Giving way to its experimental, data-driven approach in physical retail, the e-commerce giant plans to incorporate data about what people read, how they read it and why they read it. Amazon Books recently unveiled its seventh store in the US at Manhattan.

The company has plans to add six more outlets for the 21st century customer. The books in the store are selected based on reader’s ratings, ratings on its book-review sharing site Goodreads, pre-order sales, etc. The strategy is to delve deeper into Amazon’s massive online archives of reader data to steer the most popular books to its customers. The book shelves feature ratings and reviews of the books but do not display the price. To know the price, which continues to change thanks to Amazon’s shifting price system, one has to use its app or the self-price scanner.

To make a purchase, customers have to scan the code on a particular book to buy it through Amazon’s app. Amazon Books is apparently called ‘a store without walls’. Ensuring browsing and discovery, Books encourages shoppers to become part of its ecosystem by luring them with its Prime service, which would ensure best pricing and free shipping. The books are stored face out, without revealing the spine even though it takes more space. Amazon isn’t trying to cram its entire inventory into its Books stores; rather, it is making Amazon patrons order from their smartphones.

Compiled by Ananya Saha

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