1. AirAsia crash: What really happened on Flight QZ8501 in 5 points

AirAsia crash: What really happened on Flight QZ8501 in 5 points

AirAsia crash, according to Indonesian investigators, happened due to a number of events happening in a sequence in the aftermath of a technical glitch that the crippled Flight QZ8501's pilots...

By: | New Delhi | Published: December 2, 2015 10:11 PM
AirAsia crash, AirAsia flight QZ8501

The Tony Fernandes-led AirAsia’s flight QZ8501 was en route to Singapore from the Indonesian city of Surabaya on 28 December when it lost contact with air traffic control around 42 minutes after takeoff. (Reuters)

AirAsia crash, according to Indonesian investigators, happened due to a number of events happening in a sequence in the aftermath of a technical glitch that the crippled Flight QZ8501’s pilots were not able to successfully deal with causing the tragic death of 162 passengers in the Airbus A320-200 jet plane. The Tony Fernandes led airline’s Airbus A320-200 was en route to Singapore from the Indonesian city of Surabaya on 28 December when it lost contact with air traffic control around 42 minutes after takeoff. The wreckage of the AirAsia crashed plane and the bodies of the passengers were pulled from the Java Sea later, off Kalimantan, the Indonesian part of Borneo island – many were never found. Here we list the top 5 events as they happened inside the AirAsia crashed plane’s cockpit in the final moments before tragedy struck:

1. Indonesia investigators have revealed that a mid-air miscommunication between the AirAsia Flight QZ8501 pilot and the co-pilot over a technical snag caused the plane to plunge into the Java Sea last December. The investigators’ findings reveal the pilot was dealing with a repeated technical problem with the Rudder Travel Limiter (RTL), leaving the co-pilot to take control of the plane.

2. Electrical interruption to the RTL happened three times in the space of 13 minutes, eventually causing the autopilot to disengage, eventually leading to the AirAsia crash.

3. The AirAsia co-pilot was left with the option to fly the plane manually with the loss of autopilot and at that point a miscommunication emerged between him and the pilot.

4. The two black boxes and a cockpit recording of the AirAsia crashed jet reveal that the pilot instructed the co-pilot to ‘pull down’, sending the plane soaring up to 38,000 feet. Accident investigator Nurcahyo Utomo said the ‘pull down’ order was confusing as when one pull’s down [the gear controls] the plane goes up. But to make the plane go down one needs to push up.

5. The AirAsia crash report added that at one point, both the pilots appeared to be pushing the controls in the ‘opposite’ directions as the plane went into a ‘prolonged stall condition that was beyond the capability of the crew to recover’.

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