1. Sushma Swaraj: No second chance for NRIs to deposit demonetised currency

Sushma Swaraj: No second chance for NRIs to deposit demonetised currency

External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj has ruled out any new window of opportunity for NRIs or people of Indian-origin to deposit their high value Indian currency which was declared illegal after the demonetisation policy, a statement said today.

By: | Washington | Published: September 27, 2017 11:46 PM
Sushma Swaraj, NRIs, GOPIO, new york, Narendra Modi, Aadhaar card, reserve Bank of India, Middle East NRIs, banning old currencies notes Swaraj made these remarks during her interaction with a delegation of Global Organisation for People of Indian Origin (GOPIO) during her trip to New York last week, a media statement said. (PTI)

External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj has ruled out any new window of opportunity for NRIs or people of Indian-origin to deposit their high value Indian currency which was declared illegal after the demonetisation policy, a statement said today. Swaraj made these remarks during her interaction with a delegation of Global Organisation for People of Indian Origin (GOPIO) during her trip to New York last week, a media statement said.  “Swaraj informed that the government had provided the time window for Non-Resident Indians (NRIs) who are Indian citizens to deposit their currencies earlier. However, that window was not open for Diaspora Indians with foreign citizenship and the government would not be able to provide another such chance,” the GOPIO statement said.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi announced his demonetisation policy on November 8 last year, banning old currency notes of Rs 500 and Rs 1000 denomination. According to GOPIO, overseas citizens of India and people of Indian-origin are still holding demonetised currencies as the Reserve Bank of India did not allow them to deposit them.
“Diaspora Indians have close to Rs 7,500 crores still lying with them in small amounts. What should the NRIs do with the old currencies?” GOPIO asked.

During the meeting, GOPIO delegation said that NRIs did not have Aadhaar card for linking with their bank accounts. “Swaraj clarified that NRIs won’t require Aadhaar card to operate their bank accounts,” it said. GOPIO suggested that Indians citizen living anywhere in the world have an Aadhaar card similar to all US citizens having a social security number, whether staying in America or outside.

It complimented Swaraj and the Indian Missions worldwide for their pro-active role in helping Indians living outside India in time of distress, the statement said. “However, as more Middle East NRIs are returning home, we need to develop programmes to help resettle them. Swaraj said that there are many programmes for skills development as well as money available from different ministries for starting a business or technology related outfit,” the statement added. GOPIO has offered to be facilitator between the returned NRIs and the government. Consul General of India in New York Sandeep Chakravorty also participated in the meeting.

  1. R
    Reader
    Sep 28, 2017 at 6:51 am
    A centralized and inter-linked biometric database like Aadhaar will lead to profiling and self-censorship, endangering freedom. Personal data gathered under the Aadhaar program is prone to misuse and surveillance. A centralized and interlinked database can lead to commercial abuse. Aadhaar project has created a vulnerability to identi-ty fraud, even identi-ty theft. Easy harvesting of biometrics traits and publicly-available Aadhaar numbers increase the risk of impersonation, especially online and banking fraud. Centralized databases can be hacked. Biometrics can be cloned, copied and reused.
    Reply
    1. R
      Reader
      Sep 28, 2017 at 6:50 am
      UK’s Biometric ID Database was dismantled. Why the United Kingdom's biometrics-linked National Identi-ty Card project to create a centralized register of sensitive information about residents similar to Aadhaar was scrapped in 2010?? The reasons were the massive threat posed to the privacy of people, the possibility of a surveillance state, the dangers of maintaining such a huge centralized repository of personal information, and the purposes it could be used for, and the dangers of such a centralized database being hacked. The other reasons were the unreliability of such a large-scale biometric verification processes, and the ethics of using biometric identification.
      Reply
      1. R
        Reader
        Sep 28, 2017 at 6:50 am
        The US Social Security Number (SSN) card has no biometric details, no photograph, no physical description and no birth date. All it does is confirm that a particular number has been issued to a particular name. Instead, a driving license or state ID card is used as an identification for adults. The US government does not collect the biometric details of its own citizens for issuing Social Security Number.
        Reply

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