1. People face inconvenience after scrapping of Rs 500/1000 notes

People face inconvenience after scrapping of Rs 500/1000 notes

The impact of government withdrawing Rs 500 and Rs 1,000 currency notes from circulation was visible across Delhi with people facing inconvenience in buying milk, vegetables, medicines and other daily essentials and in commuting in auto-rickshaws and taxis.

By: | Islamabad | Updated: November 9, 2016 3:52 PM
rupees-reu-L Long queues were witnessed at petrol pumps as well but in most filling stations, people were asked to buy fuel in multiples of Rs 500 or Rs 1000 due to short of cash in smaller denominations. (Source: Reuters)

The impact of government withdrawing Rs 500 and Rs 1,000 currency notes from circulation was visible across Delhi with people facing inconvenience in buying milk, vegetables, medicines and other daily essentials and in commuting in auto-rickshaws and taxis.

There was chaos outside outlets of Mother Dairy, Safal and some other government-run cooperatives besides state-run hospitals, railway stations and petrol pumps which were allowed to accept Rs 500 and Rs 1000 notes till Friday.
As ATMs and banks were closed today, harried people explored various options to get smaller denominations notes such as Rs 100 and Rs 50 which were in short supply due to the heavy demand.

While there has been unnecessary panic among certain sections, small traders, rickshaw pullers, taxi and auto-rickshaw drivers said they have been hit hard due to “shortage” of smaller denomination notes as well as anxiety among people. Last night, long queues were seen outside ATMs to get Rs 100 notes.

While passengers faced inconvenience at metro stations in the morning hours as notices were pasted regarding Government’s decision on currency, later it was announced that old-high denomination notes will be accepted at metro stations till Saturday.

Long queues were witnessed at petrol pumps as well but in most filling stations, people were asked to buy fuel in multiples of Rs 500 or Rs 1000 due to short of cash in smaller denominations.

“I got petrol filled for Rs 1300 but they refused to return me Rs 200. When I argued they asked me to give change of Rs 300,” said Sonakshi Bhalla, a Gurgaon resident who commutes to Noida for work.

Chiranjeevi Arora, an IT professional, claimed, “The metro people refused to accept Rs 500 notes even after the government announced that DMRC should accept them.”

The government had yesterday, after withdrawing all Rs 500 and Rs 1,000 banknotes in circulation, announced that the old high denomination currency would continue to be accepted for next 72 hours at certain public utilities.

Please Wait while comments are loading...

Go to Top