1. Letters to the editor

Letters to the editor

Apropos of the column ‘Treat in India’ (FE, March 17), in an economy such as ours, that can be leveraged globally by a favourable PPP, cost of services, including healthcare, will stay attractive to foreigners

By: | Published: March 18, 2016 12:21 AM

Medical tourism

Apropos of the column ‘Treat in India’ (FE, March 17), in an economy such as ours, that can be leveraged globally by a favourable PPP, cost of services, including healthcare, will stay attractive to foreigners. Inadequate attention and resources from the government brought private healthcare into being in the country. Other centres will come up in due course. We have to go far beyond the misplaced concept of cocooned medical care. The performance of the MCI on oversight of quality, be it of the colleges or their output, is not much to be happy about. The admission process continues to be cavalier, just short of being scandalous. Vigilance over practicing doctors is condescending, if not complicit. How do we cope with a flood of “tourist hospitals” without serious loss of reputation? This is not a pleasure industry where an upset client can be placated. We have scant regard for life, else we would have had a law on medical accountability, that elsewhere extracts a huge premium on costs. One major lawsuit by a patient would put our medical tourism industry in jeopardy. When the visitor is an ailing person, it is no longer mere tourism but a huge national responsibility for which we are ill-prepared. That requires an innate ethos of highest professional commitment.

R Narayanan, Ghaziabad

Reform dairy sector

This refers to the central government revealing in Parliament on March 16 that 68% milk-samples across the country were found adulterated with harmful chemicals like detergent, caustic-soda, white-paint, refined oil, etc. It is time that the government allows milk and milk-products only as packaged commodities marketed by renowned companies. Public-sector companies and co-operatives are already major suppliers of milk and milk-products in urban areas. Even more units can be established by these giants to fulfil complete supply of branded milk and milk-products. Infrastructure of loss-making ‘white elephants’ such as Delhi Milk Scheme (DMS) should be fully utilised by selling/leasing them to a cooperative or semi-government agency like Mother Dairy, Amul, Sudha or Karnataka Milk Federation, etc. DMS had lost its utility after the setting up of Mother Dairy in Delhi in the year 1974. Indecision of the UPA government in this regard resulted in central government writing off huge losses, to the tune of R849 crore. Transparency and accountability may be ensured in co-operatives, including those involved in dairy-products, by bringing all co-operatives and PPPs under the purview of the RTI Act for safeguarding interests of all concerned.

Madhu Agrawal, Delhi

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