1. Letters to the editor

Letters to the editor

Apropos of the interview “Skilling India is akin to evangelising: Sanjeev Duggal, Centum Learning” (FE, February 8), it is true that the way things are playing out, the nation’s growth agenda is directly getting aligned to the skills-level of its manpower.

By: | Published: February 11, 2016 1:01 AM

Skill India to Start-up India

Apropos of the interview “Skilling India is akin to evangelising: Sanjeev Duggal, Centum Learning” (FE, February 8), it is true that the way things are playing out, the nation’s growth agenda is directly getting aligned to the skills-level of its manpower. However, a lot of work remains to be done, especially in finding people who need skills training. Remember, while it is easy to find and skill an unskilled person in metro cities and even in tier-2 towns, the challenge lies in reaching out to the remotest parts of the country. Clearly, government bodies such as the National Skill Development Corporation (NSDC) and private organisations such as Centum Learning need to make efforts to reach ‘media-dark’ states in the country, where TV and print reach only about 20% of the population, and where internet and smartphones are urban phenomena. At the same time, we have to make efforts towards changing the ‘poor country cousin’ image of a skills-based career. Let’s not forget that in the developed West, which we hold in high regard, even if a PhD student decides to pursue the vocation of a cab driver, he/she will still be considered a respected member of the society, unlike in India. Lastly, we must not forget that Skill India and Start-up India share great synergies. In fact, both complement each other. Start-up India is not about only Flipkart and Myntra, it’s about a plumber setting up a plumbing business; a carpenter opening a carpentry shop. Skill India can train people, who can then join those small start-ups and make them successful. Another good idea is to skill people to become entrepreneurs on their own terms and conditions.

Parveen Beniwal, Rohtak

Wish cars emitted oxygen

This can be equated to as one of the most outrageous statements from the corporate world. “CSE slams Jaguar Land Rover; equates claim to cars being ‘air purifiers’” (FE, February 8). Slamming luxury car company Jaguar Land Rover for calling Delhi air sucked in by its cars ‘far dirtier’ than what they emit, environmental advocacy group Centre for Science and Environment (CSE) has said this amounts to equating cars with ‘air-purifying machines’. Clearly, amid raging concerns over toxic emissions, and a lot of which are a by-product of vehicles, such statements from car companies just don’t make sense. In fact, the statement is kiddish. For the record, it was Jaguar Land Rover’s CEO Ralph Speth who, on the side-lines of the Auto Expo, said that the latest EU-VI regulation schemes have got technical features which can clean the air in Delhi. And for the record, it is Jaguar Land Rover’s diesel cars which cannot be registered in Delhi NCR until March 31, since their engine capacity is higher than 2000cc and fall under the Supreme Court interim ban. This is nothing but an attempt to mislead the public and policymakers. We expect other automotive industry players, rather than making such statements, will acknowledge public health concerns associated with toxic diesel emissions and will make efforts towards leapfrogging to BS-VI emissions standards by April 2020.

Jaiparkash Marwah, Chandigarh

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