1. Letters to the editor

Letters to the editor

Flawed leave policy

By: | Published: January 13, 2016 12:18 AM

Flawed leave policy
Apropos of the report “Share interesting details, photos of holidays: Govt to staff” (FE, January 12), it was interesting to learn that all central government employees will soon be required to share their photos and interesting details of holidays on their return after availing Leave Travel Concession (LTC) scheme. Ironically, they will henceforth be exempted from informing their controlling officers even before going on a holiday and a self-certification from them would suffice. How can an employee be absent from his duties without duly informing his bosses?  Suppose, any one of the such central government employees posted at any public utility proceeds on holidays (under the new guidelines from DoPT) after availing LTC and, in the meantime, any member of the public visits the said department, will it not put the office in an unsavoury position who may be at loss to explain his subordinate’s unscheduled absence under the proposed relaxed service rules. While one can understand the rationale behind government’s gracious move to make the procedure of processing of LTC claims time-bound, keeping controlling officers in total darkness about their managed personnel’s absence is beyond any comprehension. Incidentally, what will be achieved if someone actually shares interesting insights and pictures of his/her travels? How will the government make effective use thereof?
Kumar Gupt
Panchkula

Banking on India Post
Apropos of the edit “Stamping out competition” (FE, January 12), why should the government not favour its own undertaking, India Post? Don’t companies do it? Doesn’t Airtel promote Wynk, which is supposed to be a separate business? Doesn’t the Tata Group’s hospitality concern get business from TCS, Tata Motors? So, why should the government be bashful about giving all its business to India Post? If the corporate sector is so much in favour of competition, let it first stop subsidising group concerns. It is rather the lack of a sense of shame and ethics that the corporate sector cries unfair.  India Post, let it be known to all, has a much wider network in the rural areas than any of the other payments banks licensees have. From a policy perspective, it is, therefore, advisable that the government use the vast network to deliver the subsidies it hands out to beneficiaries in both the hinterland  and in urban India under the various schemes, including that for LPG.
Sumona Pal
Kolkata

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