1. Google Doodle: Mario Miranda art celebrated on 90th birth anniversary by search engine giant

Google Doodle: Mario Miranda art celebrated on 90th birth anniversary by search engine giant

The latest Google Doodle celebrates the life of popular artist and cartoonist Mario Miranda on his 90th birth anniversary on Monday.

By: | New Delhi | Updated: May 2, 2016 9:58 AM
Mario Miranda was born on May 2, 1926, in Daman, which was then under the control of the Portuguese. His parents were Catholics. Mario Miranda was born on May 2, 1926, in Daman, which was then under the control of the Portuguese. His parents were Catholics.

The latest Google Doodle celebrates the life of popular artist and cartoonist Mario Miranda on his 90th birth anniversary on Monday. The illustrative Doodle of Mario Miranda can be seen on the ubiquitous home page of the IT major.

Mario Miranda was born on May 2, 1926, in Daman, which was then under the control of the Portuguese. His parents were Catholics.

Mario Miranda’s cartoons embellished the pages of the now defunct The Illustrated Weekly and thereafter of The Times of India, The Economic Times and other newspapers and magazines. Foreign magazines like Mad and Punch too carried Miranda’s cartoons.

mariodemiranda (Courtesy: www.mariodemiranda.com)

Mario Miranda, who was inspired by the close confines of human habitats, especially Mumbai, died in 2012 in sleep at home in his beloved Loutolim, Goa of old age related ailments. He could fit in an immense amount of content into a very small cartoon/illustration. And, as if by a miracle, each figure stood apart and had a story to tell.

Among the books Mario authored are travelogues (where he covered a number of top cities in the world), and Goa history (co-authored with Manohar Mulgaonkar). His efforts earned Miranda the Padma Shri in 1988 and the Padma Bhushan in 2002.

Here is what Google had to says about Mario Miranda and his art: “Mario Miranda was a beloved cartoonist, best known for his works published in the Times of India and The Illustrated Weekly of India. Based primarily on the bustling cityscape of Mumbai, Miranda’s works often feature complex, multi-layered scenes. Humanity floods the canvas, and yet each character maintains their unique individuality.

(Courtesy: www.mariodemiranda.com) (Courtesy: www.mariodemiranda.com)

Our guest Doodler today is Aaron Renier, another comic artist known for portraying large crowds. “I approached Mario’s work by pretending I was drawing with him,” says Renier. “I chose his most popular style, very flat with criss-crossing interactions.” In this homage to Miranda, we see a rich litany of people, each unique in their perspective. “That is what I liked most about his work,” Renier explains, “trying to pick out who knows who, who’s watching who, who’s annoyed by who, who’s enamored by who. Hopefully people will see something of [Miranda’s] spirit in it.”

We’re pleased today to honor the legacy of Mario Miranda. His works live on throughout India, and we’re proud to provide another space for this artist’s surging style to rest.”

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