1. Classified Pakistani dossier on Karachi provides little evidence linking Kulbhushan Jadhav with terror

Classified Pakistani dossier on Karachi provides little evidence linking Kulbhushan Jadhav with terror

The latest copy of a classified dossier reveals that the document has no evidence that Jadhav was financing or providing weapons to Baloch nationalist insurgents.

By: | New Delhi | Published: April 14, 2017 10:41 AM
The copy of the dossier, obtained by The Indian Express, on a Karachi-based criminal network allegedly connected to Jadhav, is jointly authored by investigators of the Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) and civilian services. (PTI)

As the outrage over the death penalty given to the former Indian naval officer Kulbhushan Jadhav by Pakistan court continues, the latest copy of a classified dossier reveals that the document has no evidence that Jadhav was financing or providing weapons to Baloch nationalist insurgents. The copy of the dossier, obtained by The Indian Express, on a Karachi-based criminal network allegedly connected to Jadhav, is jointly authored by investigators of the Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) and civilian services. Alleging Jadhav to be collaborated with Karachi-based ganglord Uzair Baloch, the classified document mentioned that both of them were “involved in espionage activities, by providing secret information/sketches regarding Army installations and officials to foreign agents.” However, the dossier further stated that the transfer of documents were primarily for Iran and not India.

As reported by The Indian Express, a source connected to the preparation of the dossier said that Jadhav came under scanner by the investigators after the interrogation of Uzair Baloch, who was arrested on January 30, 2016. The source further claimed that Jadhav came in touch with Baloch through the ganglord’s cousin, Jaleel Baloch.

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However, Indian experts claimed that information on a military installation are of limited value to spy agencies like Research and Analysis Wing (R&AW), as it has high-resolution satellite images of the neighbouring country’s naval and army facilities. Even as Pakistani media keep accusing Jadhav to be engaged in terrorist activities, the secret military court which sentenced the former Indian navy officer with death penalty, tried him under the Official Secrets Act, which allows death sentence to individuals who are involved in passing “information which is calculated to be or might be or is intended to be, directly or indirectly, useful to an enemy”.

Earlier in the week, a Pakistani newspaper reported that Jadhav had been in touch with R&AW from 2012, seeking job as a freelance informant and had also contacted Technical Services Division, a new military intelligence outfit which was disbanded in 2014

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