1. Banks allowed to hire machines, staffers for Aadhaar card enrolment

Banks allowed to hire machines, staffers for Aadhaar card enrolment

The UIDAI has provided some "relaxation" to banks in procurement of enrolment machines and hiring private data entry operators for their Aadhaar centres.

By: | New Delhi | Published: November 19, 2017 11:42 AM
aadhaar, aadhar card, aadhaar enrollment, aadhaar card enrollment, aadhaar banks, bank account linked with aadhaar, It is done in hopes that the banks will offer such services at stipulated 10 per cent of the branches “at the earliest”, its CEO Ajay Bhushan Pandey has said. (PTI)

The UIDAI has provided some “relaxation” to banks in procurement of enrolment machines and hiring private data entry operators for their Aadhaar centres. The Aadhaar-issuing body, Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI), has allowed banks to hire private data entry operators and enrolment machines and expects the relaxation to speed up the opening of Aadhaar enrolment and updation centres at bank premises. But the reprieve has been granted with the condition that banks will have to ensure proper supervision of enrolment and updation process within their premises.  It is done in hopes that the banks will offer such services at stipulated 10 per cent of the branches “at the earliest”, its CEO Ajay Bhushan Pandey has said. “They (banks) wanted some relaxation so that they could hire operators for data entry, and also …hire the enrolment machines. So we have provided them this relaxation. Now using that, they are going ahead and setting up the (enrolment) stations…they have assured that they will do this task as early as possible,” the UIDAI CEO told PTI in an interview. Until now, banks had to procure enrolment machines on their own and place their own employees for the job of data entry, he explained. So far, only about 3,000 branches of private and public sector banks have opened Aadhaar centres within their premises as against the targeted 15,300 branches that are required to do so. “The good thing is they are all catching up and they have started getting into this. Many of them have placed order on GeM (Government e-Marketplace) portal and they are in the process of procurement,” he said.

Asked about the time it would take for banks to achieve the target of opening Aadhaar centres in at least 10 per cent of their branches, Pandey said, “It should be possible within next few weeks”. “The entire idea is that people should get the convenience as early as possible,” he added. On whether the UIDAI would take action against the banks for not meeting the deadline of October 31 for opening such centres, Pandey declined to spell out the consequences saying that the authority will have to take a considered view on whether banks can demonstrate valid reasons for missing the deadline. “If they (banks) are able to demonstrate that they faced a genuine difficulty then appropriate view can be taken. At this stage, it is difficult to say what exactly will be the consequences,” he added.

The Bank Aadhaar Kendras are being set up with a view to make the Aadhaar verification process of bank accounts convenient for the people and also to have more Aadhaar centres across the country. According to UIDAI stipulation, 43 private and public sector banks have to open Aadhaar enrolment and updation centres in 15,315 branches.

  1. R
    Reader
    Nov 19, 2017 at 2:51 pm
    The biometrics-based Aadhaar program is inherently flawed. Biometrics can be easily lifted by external means, there is no need to hack the system. High-resolution cameras can capture your fingerprints and iris information from a distance. Every eye hospital will have iris images of its patients. So another person can CLONE your fingerprints and iris images without your knowledge, and the same can be used for authentication. That is why advanced countries like the US, UK, etc. did not implement such a self-destructive biometrics-based system. If the biometric details of a person are COMPROMISED ONCE, then even a new Aadhaar card will not help that person. This is NOT like blocking an ATM card and taking a new one.
    Reply
    1. R
      Reader
      Nov 19, 2017 at 1:35 pm
      UK’s Biometric ID Database was dismantled. Why the United Kingdom's biometrics-linked National Identi-ty Card project to create a centralized register of sensitive information about residents similar to Aadhaar was scrapped in 2010?? The reasons were the massive threat posed to the privacy of people, the possibility of a surveillance state, the dangers of maintaining such a huge centralized repository of personal information and the purposes it could be used for, the dangers of such a centralized database being hacked, and the unreliability of such large-scale biometric verification processes. The Aadhaar program was designed in 2009 by mainly considering the 'Identi-ty Cards Act 2006' of UK, but the UK stopped that project in 2010, whereas India continued with the biometrics-based program. We must think why the United Kingdom abandoned their project and destroyed the data collected. (Google: 'Identi-ty Cards Act 2006' and 'Identi-ty Documents Act 2010' )
      Reply
      1. R
        Reader
        Nov 19, 2017 at 1:34 pm
        A centralized and inter-linked biometric database like Aadhaar will lead to profiling and self-censorship, endangering freedom. Personal data gathered under the Aadhaar program is prone to misuse and surveillance. Aadhaar project has created a vulnerability to identi-ty fraud, even identi-ty theft. Easy harvesting of biometrics traits and publicly-available Aadhaar numbers increase the risk of impersonation, especially online and banking fraud. Centralized databases can be hacked. Biometrics can be cloned, copied and reused. Thus, BIOMETRICS CAN BE FAKED. High-resolution cameras can capture your fingerprints and iris information from a distance. Every eye hospital will have iris images of its patients. So another person can clone your fingerprints and iris images without your knowledge, and the same can be used for authentication. If the Aadhaar scheme is NOT STOPPED by the Supreme Court, the biometric features of Indians will soon be cloned, misused, and even traded.
        Reply
        1. R
          Reader
          Nov 19, 2017 at 1:33 pm
          The US Social Security Number (SSN) card has NO BIOMETRIC DETAILS, no photograph, no physical description and no birth date. All it does is confirm that a particular number has been issued to a particular name. Instead, a driving license or state ID card is used as an identification for adults. The US government DOES NOT collect the biometric details of its own citizens for the purpose of issuing Social Security Number. The US collects the fingerprints of only those citizens who are involved in any criminal activity (it has nothing to do with SSN), and the citizens of other countries who come to the US.
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