1. Aadhaar, world’s biggest biometric database, grows in India amid doubt

Aadhaar, world’s biggest biometric database, grows in India amid doubt

Prime Minister Narendra Modi is pushing Indians to link their digital IDs to a host of services such as credit cards and cellphones, even as the Supreme Court will hear petitions Thursday seeking to limit the scope of the world’s largest biometric database.

By: | Published: December 14, 2017 11:23 AM
Aadhaar, narendra modi, digital IDs,  Aadhaar ID mandatory, Aadhaar numbers, Social welfare benefits, PAN numbers, latest news on Aadhaar, latest news on Aadhaar, world biggest biometric database Almost 1 billion people had signed up for the program before a landmark privacy ruling in August strengthened the case against making the Aadhaar ID mandatory. (IE)

Prime Minister Narendra Modi is pushing Indians to link their digital IDs to a host of services such as credit cards and cellphones, even as the Supreme Court will hear petitions Thursday seeking to limit the scope of the world’s largest biometric database. Almost 1 billion people had signed up for the program before a landmark privacy ruling in August strengthened the case against making the Aadhaar ID mandatory. The court will now decide on the validity of the government’s order to meet specified deadlines. Last month, it told banks and utilities to stop scaring customers after people complained about a barrage of emails and text messages warning of frozen accounts and invalidated sim cards if they failed to comply with the government’s push. To be sure, the court’s immediate hearing will only pertain to the deadlines, with more detailed arguments on overall legality probably next year. While officials say Aadhaar is saving the government billions of dollars by better targeting beneficiaries of subsidized food and cash transfers, critics point to unfair exclusions and data leaks.

“Instances of the exclusion of genuine beneficiaries and the public disclosure of Aadhaar numbers make it clear that significant room exists for instituting more substantive privacy protections and grievance redressal mechanisms,” said Saksham Khosla, an analyst at Carnegie India. “The Supreme Court can mandate critical safeguards.” Aadhaar is a unique 12-digit number assigned to Indian residents, backed by their fingerprints, iris scans and certain demographic details. Some lawyers and activists, such as Shyam Divan, say that once linked to various services it will offer the government a web of information about each individual that will violate the person’s privacy.

Surveillance State

“The Aadhaar Act purports to provide legal sanction to a program that lays the framework for real time surveillance of every Indian,” Divan said. Hearings are due to start at 11:30 a.m. in New Delhi on Thursday.

Indians are mandated to link their Aadhaar to:

Government-issued Permanant Account Numbers, which help track tax filings Bank accounts, credit cards, insurance policies, mutual funds, pension plans Social welfare benefits such as cooking gas subsidies

Mobile numbers Enrollments to Aadhaar have increased by about 80 million over the past year — roughly the entire population of Germany — as pressure built on citizens to either link or forfeit these services. Modi had rejected Aadhaar while in opposition, terming it a threat to national security. However, he has since embraced and extended its scope far beyond what was envisioned earlier.

Data Leaks

The program is also plagued by allegations of data leaks, where personal details of users were made public on government websites. The Unique Identification Authority of India, which administers Aadhaar, has denied database vulnerabilities. Meanwhile newspapers continue to carry reports about poor or disabled Indians — such as leprosy patients — who are denied food and pensions because they either lack an Aadhaar number or the fingerprints and iris scans needed to apply for one. Privacy experts and lawyers suggest the Supreme Court’s ruling this August that Indians have a fundamental right to privacy could be a setback to the government’s push. A right to privacy, activists say, means the government can’t force Indian citizens to hand over their unique biometric data to the government in order to receive basic government services.

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  1. R
    Reader
    Dec 14, 2017 at 9:04 pm
    The biometrics-based Aadhaar program is inherently flawed. Biometrics can be easily lifted by external means, there is no need to hack the system. High-resolution cameras can capture your fingerprints and iris information from a distance. Every eye hospital will have iris images of its patients. So another person can CLONE your fingerprints and iris images without your knowledge, and the same can be used for authentication. That is why advanced countries like the US, UK, etc. did not implement such a self-destructive biometrics-based system. If the biometric details of a person are COMPROMISED ONCE, then even a new Aadhaar card will not help that person. This is NOT like blocking an ATM card and taking a new one. If the Aadhaar scheme is NOT STOPPED by the Supreme Court, the biometric features of Indians will soon be cloned, misused, and even traded.
    Reply
    1. R
      Reader
      Dec 14, 2017 at 9:04 pm
      UK’s Biometric ID Database was dismantled. Why the United Kingdom's biometrics-linked National Identi-ty Card project to create a centralized register of sensitive information about residents similar to Aadhaar was scrapped in 2010?? The reasons were the massive threat posed to the privacy of people, the possibility of a surveillance state, the dangers of maintaining such a huge centralized repository of personal information and the purposes it could be used for, the dangers of such a centralized database being hacked, and the unreliability of such large-scale biometric verification processes. The Aadhaar program was designed in 2009 by mainly considering the 'Identi-ty Cards Act 2006' of UK, but the UK stopped that project in 2010, whereas India continued with the biometrics-based program. We must think why the United Kingdom abandoned their project and destroyed the data collected. (Google: 'Identi-ty Cards Act 2006' and 'Identi-ty Documents Act 2010' )
      Reply
      1. R
        Reader
        Dec 14, 2017 at 9:03 pm
        The US Social Security Number (SSN) card has NO BIOMETRIC DETAILS, no photograph, no physical description and no birth date. All it does is confirm that a particular number has been issued to a particular name. Instead, a driving license or state ID card is used as an identification for adults. The US government DOES NOT collect the biometric details of its own citizens for the purpose of issuing Social Security Number. The US collects the fingerprints of only those citizens who are involved in any criminal activity (it has nothing to do with SSN), and the citizens of other countries who come to the US.
        Reply

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