1. Supreme Court upholds ban on sale of large diesel cars in Delhi

Supreme Court upholds ban on sale of large diesel cars in Delhi

Supreme court on Tuesday upheld a temporary ban on the sale of large diesel cars in New Delhi to combat toxic smog in India's capital

By: | New Delhi | Published: January 5, 2016 4:00 PM
Ban on diesel vehicles, Air Pollution Delhi, National Green Tribunal, New Delhi, New Delhi Pollution, Delhi goods price, price rise, inflation, economy news

Supreme court on Tuesday upheld a temporary ban on the sale of large diesel cars in New Delhi to combat toxic smog in India’s capital (Source: Praveen Khanna)

Supreme court on Tuesday upheld a temporary ban on the sale of large diesel cars in New Delhi to combat toxic smog in India’s capital, but postponed hearing an industry appeal on an environmental tax that carmakers say will hit investment.

Delhi’s block on new diesel cars has unsettled the industry, its salesmen and investors, who warn the ban and uncertainty surrounding it could derail a tentative recovery in auto sales.

Green groups want to extend the ban to smaller diesel cars and other smog-choked cities in India.

The presiding Supreme Court judge said on Tuesday that the court was considering expanding the ban to diesel cars with engine capacity of less than 2,000 cc – currently not covered – but would first seek industry input on the matter.

The Supreme Court had also been expected to rule on Tuesday on a separate green tax on all diesel cars in the city, but has yet to announce its decision on that levy.

The decision on the tax, critical for automakers such as Mahindra & Mahindra, Tata Motors and Toyota Motor Corp that have invested heavily in making cars for diesel-loving Indian consumers, may now be heard next week.

Delhi is one of the world’s most polluted cities, with its residents often struggling to breathe in air quality that is worse than in the Chinese capital of Beijing.

India’s automakers say they want a comprehensive plan – rather than court-led initiatives – to determine the regulatory structure.

  1. Subramaniam Dharana
    Jan 6, 2016 at 12:45 am
    It is a clear case of the major stakeholder viz., the auto makers , refused to be part of a conscious seeker of providing cleaner environment. For such a long years it never wanted to look into the exhaust that these vehicles were emitting . It never wanted to be a serious on the matter of pollution that its vehicles were causing. Rather like VV it all the time wanted to cirvent the rules. The ideal case would have been the industry leader to come out of its own solution of providing much reduced polluting levels . That this industry has failed to do. It wanted to make quick money since the price of diesel was lower than petrol. Now also it is not late. They must come out with design of engines which will reduce further pollution levels. Make such vehicles responsible for better living. Period.
    Reply
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      Atul
      Jan 5, 2016 at 11:31 am
      Hon Court may be right as far as pollution control is concerned but what about the industry.How will it survive? Moreover as per media report even oddeven will not help because pollution by car is only two percent.What needs to be done is not to permit vehicles of certain age from plying.
      Reply

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