Aston Martin Valkyrie: The $3 million 1000 hp hypercar concept is now closer to reality


  • Aston Martin Valkyrie was first unveiled in July 2016 amidst quite a wide-eyed response and ever since then Red Bull Advanced Technologies and project partner AF Racing have been working intensively to further develop the hypercar's aerodynamics, body styling and cockpit.

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  • First look of the car tells that there is a lot of space underneath the car which will feed air to the rear diffuser. These tunnels are the key to generating the Aston Martin Valkyrie’s extraordinary levels of downforce while keeping the upper body surfaces.

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  • To be able to create space inside the cabin, Aston Martin have bolted the seats directly on to the tub and the driver will be in a reclining position with their feet up, similar to a Formula car. A four-point harness comes as standard, while an optional six-point harness will be offered for those who intend to do more track driving. The Valkyrie is said to cost US$3.2 million, the 1000 hp-plus two-seater is still being tweaked for better aerodynamic downforce.

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  • To keep the driver's focus on driving and distractions to a minimum, all switchgear is located on the steering wheel, with all the vital signs shown on a single OLED display screen. The steering wheel is also detachable, and serves as an additional security device.

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  • Aston did not want to mess with the aerodynamic perfection of the car, niether did they want to disturb the style, hence the rear view mirrors were replaced by discreetly mounted rear facing cameras. The video feeds from the cameras mimic the view provided by conventional door mirrors.

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  • Aston Martin and Red Bull Racing will make 150 cars starting late next year. And sure it may not look like it, but the Valkyrie is road legal.

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  • It features one of the most striking headlamps ever seen on a car. The headlights take inspiration from the pure functionality of a Formula One car's components.

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  • The traditional wing badge was considered to heavy for the Valkyrie, hence the engineers created a chemical etched aluminium badge just 70 microns thick. That’s 30 per cent thinner than a human hair, and a remarkable 99.4 per cent lighter than the regular enamel wings badge. It was nicknamed 'lacewing'.

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