What makes the WR-V a success after the failure of earlier RV models in India? Find out here

Honda has been trying time and time again to launch their RV series, but try as they may they couldn’t succeed. The CR-V tried and failed time and time again. The BR-v looked extremely promising but then that too failed to perform, until of course, the W-RV came along.

Honda has been trying time and time again to launch their RV series, but try as they may they couldn’t succeed. The CR-V tried and failed time and time again. The BR-v looked extremely promising but then that too failed to perform, until of course, the W-RV came along. And it worked! And how it is presently the fifth highest selling Ute in the country selling more than 3000 units a month! This brings us to the question of as to what the WR-V did that others could not. Why did it succeed where others failed? Was it Honda’s Achilles heel aka the price point, was it the type of product or can it be boiled down to the fickle Indian buyer? Remember that none of these we’re segmenting openers and each segment has grown exponentially since the BR-V and the CR-V were launched.Let’s first move the CR-V out of contention just on the basis that Honda dropped the ball with it and terribly so, they priced it more premium than it was, they didn’t care to update it when the competition was already aeons ahead and their general attitude to promoting has been lackadaisical at best. But they have been on the ball with the BR-V and WR-V in many ways similar to the way they’ve always managed to keep the City afloat.

Now the BR-V and the WR-V are literally stacked one on top of the other, the BR-V with its extra row of seats picks up exactly where the WR-Vs top model finishes. As you can see below:

WR-V Petrol Rs. 7.75-8.99 lakh

BR-V Petrol Rs. 8.88-12.13 lakh

WR-V Diesel Rs. 8.79-9.99 lakh

BR-V Diesel Rs. 9.99-13.04 lakh

While the WR-V is basically a Jazz with some added ground clearance and rugged lines, the BR-V is an out and out crossover with an extra row of seats. Both have equal terms as far as kit is concerned. The problem as far as we can tell is that while one promises to be a low-cost low maintenance car which retains the frugal 1.5-litre diesel and ditches the less economical 1.5-litre petrol car. We think the answer lies in the WR-V itself, the fact that it is the more practical of the two. It has all the same features, comfort, and safety, and is more frugal. Yes, it gets an extra row of seats but then 364 days out the day you won’t need an extra row of seats. And that’s what the Indian buyer wants a car that can be used 364 days a year without burning a hole in your bank account, for the days that remain there’s always Uber.

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