2018 Ford Endeavour facelift spied, to compete with Toyota Fortuner and Isuzu MU-X

The 2018 Endeavour is expected to use the same powertrain as in the current generation Endeavour and will be powered by two diesel engines- 2.2 litre and 3.2 litre.

By: | Updated: June 15, 2017 2:19 PM

Ford Australia has started testing the facelifted version of Everest, which is known as Endeavour in India. According to the recent spy shots by Car Advice, the Everest or Endeavour will get updates to the front including the LED DRL's and a new grille inspired by the Ford F-150 truck. The Australian spec version of the Endeavour will get radar cruise control with autonomous emergency braking (AEB), however, the Indian spec might not carry these safety aids.

The 2018 Endeavour is expected to use the same powertrain as in the current generation Endeavour and will be powered by two diesel engines- 2.2 litre and 3.2 litre. The 2.2 litre engine delivers 158 hp of power and 385 Nm of torque,while the 3.2 litre engine produces 198 hp of power and 470 Nm of torque. The smaller engine comes with a 6-speed manual and automatic transmission, while the 3.2 litre diesel unit comes only with an 6-speed automatic transmission. The top end diesel also comes with an all wheel drive and a Terrain Management System.

Earlier, Ford India had updated the Endeavour infotainment system with SYNC 3 technology, which is compatible with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. The new model isn't expected to feature any major changes in the cabin. We expect some minor feature upgrades and a bit of design improvisation in order to freshen up the cabin viz-a-viz the competition. Details about this, however, haven't been disclosed by the company yet.

The current generation Endeavour is sold at a price of Rs. 25.49 lakh - 31.50 Lakh, ex-showroom,Delhi and is available in two variants- Trend and Titanium. It is expected that facelifted Endeavour will be launched next year in 2018, and will compete with the likes of Izuzu MU-X and Toyota Fortuner.

Image source- Caradvice