James Hillier’s scary Isle of Man moment proves TT riders are on a different level altogether

James ‘Dynamite’ Hillier happened to have a frightening moment on a corner called the ‘Ballagarey Corner’, but is popularly knwon as the ‘Balla-scary’

By: | Published: June 13, 2017 2:16 PM

The Isle of Man Senior TT race, clearly the most dangerous race in the world, came to an end with Michael Dunlop winning the title. This year a total of three riders lost their lives competing for the top spot. Jochem van den Hoek, Davey Lambert and Alan Bonner were killed in unfortunate accidents within a span of a week. Last year, five riders died on the course during official practices or races. There were six fatalities in the 1970 Isle of Man TT, making it the deadliest year in the history of the event.

James ‘Dynamite’ Hillier happened to have a frightening moment on a corner called the ‘Ballagarey Corner’, but is popularly knwon as the ‘Balla-scary.’ Riders often enter this corner at massive speeds of about 225 kmph. The Balla-scary is a tight bend, with stone walls on either sides, traffic lights and a telegraph pole, that leaves very little room for error. This is perhaps one of the reasons besides big speed that makes this race so on-the-edge dangerous.

Hillier too was doing over 200 kmph while exiting the corner. He is seen losing control on his motorcycle, but after scaring himself and the onlookers to death, he manages to stay onboard and carry on like nothing had happened. It is difficult to say what all must have gone through his mind in that moment.

The incident, however, did not seem to bog Hillier down at all. He actually went on to finish fourth in that race, followed by a tweet where he advices on how 'NOT' to exit the balagarey section, with a hastag #lucky.

Hillier might call himself lucky, but really the fact here is that TT riders are the best in the world. Isle of Man TT is unlike any other race - there are no run offs, no safe environment of a track, just men with an iron clad will riding extremely fast motorcycles doing speeds of over 300 kmph on a closed public road.