Indians prefer vacations without their mobile devices: Survey

Written by FE Online | Mumbai | Updated: Aug 12 2014, 22:00pm hrs
Thailand travellers have been named as the nation least prepared to give up their mobile devices when going on holiday, according to a new global survey from For a huge 85 per cent of them, the thought of going on holiday without their beloved gadgets would bring them out in a cold sweat.

The study, which looks into digital holiday habits across 28 different countries worldwide, explores which nations find it most difficult to achieve that ever-important work/life balance and switch off when holidaying. Closely behind Thailand was Korea in second place with 78 per cent of the nation finding it difficult to be without their device, and Japan in third place with 69 per cent.

Comparatively, India came in last place, with only 20 per cent of respondents being reluctant to fob off their phone while on holiday. When it comes to Indians, the study revealed that one in five (20 per cent) regret spending too much time on their mobile device once they've returned to home soil. No wonder then, as three out of five (58 per cent) admit to checking work e-mails while away and seven in 10 (71 per cent) concede that they try to use their holiday to forget about work. But being unable to disconnect isn't just about being connected to work, as having access to social media, wherever they are, is very important to one in five (20 per cent) Indians.

The study also revealed the India's top ten most important travel items. While the mobile phone still came in relatively high in second position, it was trumped by the ever-important passport, which came in first place, proving that for Indians foreign fancies still trump domestic dalliances when it comes to holidaying. While travel insurance and sunscreen came in third and fourth place respectively, the gym kit came in last at 10, illustrating a lackadaisical attitude to exercise from Indians, when on holiday.

When it comes to which countries are most likely to exaggerate their holiday experiences, China came top of the pile with 67 per cent of respondents likely to lie to friends and family when returning home. Close behind in second place came Germany with 64 per cent, and Korea in third place with just under half (48 per cent) admitting they would embellish a story to impress others. India came in seventh place with (40 per cent) of Indians admitting to fibbing about their adventures.

Zoe Chan of the brand, said, "Going away on holiday should be a time to take stock and unwind, whether you're lying on a beach in the Seychelles or snowboarding down a mountain in Canada. While smartphones have their plus points while on leave from work, using them to check the weather or view maps, it seems travellers would benefit from switching off their e-mails to disconnect, restoring a little more of the all-important work/life balance."